Letters

Helping Paws?
Obviously, Ms. Tesar had a bad day on July 16 ["Hound's Hell," by Russell Contreras, August 20]. I can't understand what she might have done to ruffle the cops as she apparently did on that night. After what happened, even if she was acting ornery or whatever, most of her grief wasn't deserved.

None of us were there, but it seems like she was treated heavy-handedly and didn't do anything wrong. She has probably never thought about it, but if there is anyone who deserves a little unexpected help, it's her.

Charles Westmoreland
via Internet

Meagher Memorial
How much better would we have been served if the space that you used to "humanize" Erica Sheppard ["Of Life and Death," by Muriel L. Sims, August 13] had been used to eulogize victim Marilyn Sage Meagher? I didn't know her, never met her, but I couldn't help but wonder about her.

How old were her children? How long did they grieve? How many nights did her husband (married?) stay awake wondering how he was going to face the next day?

You waste no effort in your investigation of the legal troubles of Ms. Sheppard, but I can't help but wonder if Marilyn's family has any emotional troubles whenever they see a mother hug her child. I'm sure the fact that Sheppard "will not allow her spirit to be caged" is a great source of comfort to them. As Meagher lay on the floor, blood coming from her throat, was her last thought of her children? Do you think the last words she heard were Ms. Sheppard saying, "I'm just caught up in this situation"?

These are the questions that should have been addressed. Not whether an animal, who has done nothing for humanity except decrease the number by one, has received "every fair shake."

Dan Henseler
via Internet

Sour on the Shares
The article about time-share vacations at Piney Shores near Conroe ["Time Lines," by John Carroll, August 6] could have been written by me, as I experienced pretty much the same thing this past spring.

When contacted by their telemarketers, I was told I would be "very happy" regarding my prize if I kept the appointment. Funny, I don't recall being "very happy" to receive the ten day-passes (for a party of four) to the resort.

So the tour guides could concentrate on getting us to say "yes" to this "one-time" offer and not have to worry about the kids we brought along, we were invited to drop them off in the daycare center. This single-wide was staffed by two of the most disinterested people they could dredge up. My kids gave me a look of "Please don't leave us here!" We didn't.

When we first decided to decline the offer of joining, the tour guide brought in the serious sales-closer. It was funny that with each "No," the price continued to get lower. In our case, they couldn't have given it away.

Name withheld by request
via Internet

NORML No-Nos
It's unfortunate that the Houston Press allowed DARE apologist Sergeant Fletcher to libel NORML ["Reefer Madness," by T.R. Coleman, July 9]. Sergeant Fletcher, flailing in his defense of the most expensive and oft-criticized government education program of the last decade, is quoted as saying that the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws wants kids to use drugs recreationally.

For 28 years, NORML has responsibly advocated that laws and mores for responsible cannabis use be treated in the same manner that American society has developed for alcohol. Meaning: a strong message of abstinence for youth consumption and effective civil and criminal deterrence of irresponsible use or abuse.

Nowhere in NORML's extensive archives and its popular home page (www.norml.org) does NORML advocate or encourage adults -- let alone children -- to use cannabis. NORML has one of the most straightforward and understandable abstinence messages found in America.

Allen St. Pierre
Executive Director, NORML Foundation
Washington, D.C.

Reach the Beach!
Okay, so it's real nice and all that you got the Public News out of debt. And it's okay that it is no longer published. And it's just fine that you print all of the music venues' band schedules more completely than the Chronicle. However, I feel that Galveston is being left out! I used to be able to keep up on all of the entertainment coming to Houston by walking into most any pub in Galveston and picking up a Public News.

Now I have to make a special trip each week to Clear Lake just to get the Houston Press. Don't get me wrong, I actually prefer the Houston Press. But you see, I can't seem to find it anywhere on this damn island! Could you please start delivering down here? We Galvestonians let all of you Houstonians invade our island every weekend, Mardi Gras and summer. The least you can do is let us in on all of your fun stuff (or at least let us know about it).

Sarah Plumley
Galveston

"Dis" Service?
It's apparent that Eric Lawlor is "somebody" by the treatment he received at Tasca ["Setting a New Standard," August 20]. While I wholeheartedly agree with his opinion of the food, his experience with the service was nothing close to mine. As a downtown resident, I looked forward to Tasca, hoping it would be another place to hang, other than Solero. Unfortunately, only one of my four trips has produced service worthy of a 15 percent tip.

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