This Week's Day-by-Day Picks

Thursday, October 2
If you like to imagine yourself wearing thin linen pants, strolling the deck of a magnificent 50-footer anchored off an uncharted Caribbean isle, then come feed the fantasy at today's Houston In-the-Water Boat Show. Seasoned boating enthusiasts and novices alike can check out more than 200 boats bobbing around in the water, price tags attached. Shoppers who aren't in the market for hardware can peruse nautical gifts, apparel, food, art and information on boat-friendly resorts. We only recommend that you avoid any three-hour cruises offered by guys named Skipper. Noon to 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, October 2 and 3; 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturday, October 4; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, October 5. Watergate Yachting Center, 1500 Marina Bay Drive, Kemah. For information, call 713-526-6361 or visit www.houstonboatshows.com. $7 for adults; $3 for kids.

Friday, October 3
Overall, the wave of political correctness that struck our culture during the '90s was a good thing. Sexual harassment law, for example, made great strides during that period. But that doesn't mean the laws can't be, um, perverted, causing unfair firings and lawsuits. In most cases, only the two parties involved know for sure what occurred behind closed office doors. But in the Fan Factory's production of David Mamet's Oleanna,the audience is privy to the three meetings between a professor and his female student. After both parties end up hurt, we're left to judge for ourselves who was in the right and who was treated unfairly. 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through October 25. Midtown Arts Center, 1423 Holman. For information, call 832-465-4563 or visit www.fanfactory.org. $10; $8 for students and seniors.

Saturday, October 4
It's time to bust out the red, yellow and green, mon. The official Bob Marley Festival tour is making its annual stop in its hometown of Houston today. Dance to Jamaican rhythms, have a Red Stripe beer (or some Blue Mountain coffee) and feel the One Love flow as festivalgoers pour out, smoke up and celebrate the life of the late, great Robert Nesta Marley. Noon to 10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, October 4 and 5. Eleanor Tinsley Park, 500 Allen Parkway. For information, call 866-730-7226 or visit www.bobmarleyfestival.us. $10; free for kids.

Watch Tampa take on Indianapolis from the cool 
comfort of a movie theater seat at the Alamo 
Drafthouse. See Monday.
The Tampa Tribune
Watch Tampa take on Indianapolis from the cool comfort of a movie theater seat at the Alamo Drafthouse. See Monday.

Sunday, October 5
By now, everyone in the country knows that the average body mass of Houstonians is second to none. Well, here's the perfect sport for us. The Lone Star Sumo Association is bringing the traditional Japanese sport to Houston today for its Houston Samurai Sumo Workshop, Team Tryouts and Mini-Competition. Participants in the workshop will learn sumo techniques and the rules and etiquette of the sport. Come see how the traditional mawashi (the silken loincloth worn by sumo wrestlers) offsets your love handles. 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Finch's Gymnastics USA, 10903 Tower Oaks Boulevard. For information, call 409-938-3821 or visit www.lonestarsumo.com. $10.

Monday, October 6
Live sporting events can be thrilling, but more often than not, the parking's difficult, the restrooms are nasty, and the beer's expensive. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has amenities that you just can't get in a football stadium -- outside the luxury boxes, anyway. Today, the Indianapolis Colts will play the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on NFL Monday Night Football, and you can see the game from a comfy movie theater seat at the Alamo. Watch all the action on a larger-than-Jumbotron screen with theater-quality Dolby Surround Sound as servers bring pizza, burgers, pasta, sandwiches and $2.50 pints right to your seat. We'll bet you don't get that kind of service in your living room. 9 p.m. 1000 West Oaks Mall. For information, call 281-556-5200 or visit www.alamodrafthouse.com. Free.

Tuesday, October 7
Writers of whodunits are some of literature's most clever craftsmen. They can pull readers into the middle of a mystery and keep them there, guessing and looking for clues right along with the gumshoes and townsfolk who populate their tales. If you've ever wondered how mystery writers manage these tricks of their trade, we recommend listening to authors Bill Crider and Dean James talk about their craft and read from their books about crime and punishment. Crider is the author of the Sheriff Dan Rhodes mystery series, which is set in a small Texas county. He also wrote A Knife in the Back, a tale of murder that takes place in the English department of a college campus. James is the manager of the nationally-known local mystery bookstore Murder By the Book and writes the Simon Kirby-Jones series; his recent offering, Posted to Death, stars an American vampire who stirs up trouble in England. 4 p.m. Rice University's Fondren Library, 6100 Main Street. For information, call 713-348-2586. Free.

Wednesday, October 8
Dharma. Does the word make you think of the daffy blond with the bland husband in that sitcom? Or does it bring to mind late nights reading Allen Ginsburg and Jack Kerouac by candlelight? Of course, to millions of Hindus and Buddhists around the world, dharma summons neither TV character nor drunken writer, but the major religious tenets of "natural law" and "ideal truth." And then there are the folks at warehouse district eatery Dharma Cafe. To them, the word means "successful two-year-old restaurant." Today, they're celebrating the cafe's second anniversary. Guests will enjoy free Dharma cake and a scoop of homemade Dharma gelato. If you choose to sample the filet mignon, go ahead -- it's your karma. 11 a.m. 1302 Nance. For information, call 713-222-6996. Free.

 
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