Clash Course

Warriors of the right take their battle against the left to the streets of New York

Unless you watch Fox News Channel, which has run a story on the Protest Warriors, or listen to Rush Limbaugh, you probably have never heard of a Protest Warrior. Nationally, there are only 8,000 of them, most of whom have signed up on the group's Web site but have not participated in an "operation," like the one at Halliburton or last week's counterprotest during the Republican National Convention in New York City.

Many work in the Internet and computer software businesses; some even work in government cubicles. They're married, have kids, grew up with family in the military. For many of them, Protest Warrior serves as an outlet for business and social networking. "It's kinda cool to meet other conservatives who are fired up about what they believe in and willing to defend it," Taylor says.

Their leaders are Alan Lipton and Kfir Alfia. The 30-year-old Alfia moved to Dallas from Israel when he was two; his father is in the diamond business. He and 29-year-old Lipton grew up together, attending Hebrew school at Akiba Academy and then J.J. Pearce High School before going their separate ways -- Alfia to the University of Texas at Austin, Lipton to Syracuse University and then to the University of Southern California to study film. When they were in their teens, both men now say, they read such libertarian writers as Friedrich Hayek and Ayn Rand, as well as conservative publications such as The National Review. They gulped down talk radio.

A call to arms: Protest Warrior co-founder Alan Lipton 
tells the assembled that "200,000 freedom-haters 
have come to spit on the Statue of Liberty," and that 
they have to go through the Warriors first.
Ken Howard
A call to arms: Protest Warrior co-founder Alan Lipton tells the assembled that "200,000 freedom-haters have come to spit on the Statue of Liberty," and that they have to go through the Warriors first.
The day before the march, the Protest Warriors met 
on a Manhattan rooftop to plan their strategy.
Ken Howard
The day before the march, the Protest Warriors met on a Manhattan rooftop to plan their strategy.

They were reunited in February 2003 in San Francisco, where Alfia was working as a computer-chip designer. Lipton went to visit his old friend, and with two other friends they crashed a February 16 antiwar protest. Alfia carried a sign featuring a woman in a burqa tied to a pole, a leash around her neck; the sign read, "Protest Islamic Property Against Western Imperialism. SAY NO TO WAR!" Lipton's said, "Saddam Only Kills His Own People. IT'S NONE OF OUR BUSINESS!"

On February 17, they were on Limbaugh's radio show describing how they'd been met with shouts and spit -- "so much hate," Alfia says now. Limbaugh posted pictures they had taken at the protest on his Web site. They had Rush's blessings, and what began as a lark grew into a movement.

Last summer Alfia and Lipton moved to Austin, which is now Protest Warrior's headquarters. They like the city, Lipton says, for its "conservative economics and liberal culture." There are active chapters all across the state -- the Houston chapter boasts 140 members, Austin's 124 -- and across the country. The group's Web site, www.protestwarrior.com, shows tiny chapters in such faraway places as Jerusalem, London and Tokyo.

Lipton and Alfia acknowledge they are extremists confronting other extremists. They claim as their enemies not "moderate liberals" but such leftist "fringe" groups as International A.N.S.W.E.R., which organized the November 2002 antiwar march in Washington, D.C., and had a large presence in the New York protests last week. The group's initials stand for "Act Now to Stop War and End Racism," but according to reports in salon.com and the L.A. Weekly, among others, A.N.S.W.E.R. is also a front for the Marxist Workers World Party, which supports Fidel Castro and the abolition of private property and has heaped praise upon the likes of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Il.

"They're robots: 'Halliburton, corporations are bad. Bush lies,' " Lipton says. "They can't talk any idea, any philosophy, any ideology. I just continue to be amazed at how bankrupt they really are. And I know they're a fringe, but I would say, 'Moderate Democrats, just remember, they are your base. They are what happens when you take the principle of the left all the way.' "

Typical of the Protest Warriors' membership are Dallas chapter member Bill Garrett, a 44-year-old computer software salesman, and 29-year-old Paul Harrold, an engineering and environmental consultant. Before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Garrett considered himself a "Lieberman liberal" and a CNN man. But after he found the Fox News Channel and Bill O'Reilly, Garrett realized he was becoming a conservative, especially if that meant supporting the war on terror and, in particular, overthrowing Saddam Hussein.

"To be honest, what made me start doing this is the hate I see coming from the left," he says. "Every time you turn on the TV, someone's bashing Bush. I almost considered myself a liberal till I heard all the hate coming from the left. I get on the Internet and research all these groups, and I found out their money's coming from the Workers World Party, and the more I learned about them, it made me mad. I decided to do something, and I stumbled across Protest Warriors, and I was like, 'Hey, this sounds like something I wanna do.' "

At this moment, Garrett and Harrold sit in the American Airlines terminal at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, waiting to board a flight for New York City. It's the day before the August 29 United for Peace and Justice march in Manhattan, an antiwar protest scheduled to take place the day before the Republican National Convention begins.

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