Clash Course

Warriors of the right take their battle against the left to the streets of New York

Not 100 yards into their march a call goes up for everyone to retreat back to HQ. It's a false start. "I don't know whether we're coming or going," says the officer already confused by the signs.

About 15 minutes later, Alfia shouts to the flock.

"Protest Warriors, are you ready to march?" They cheer, sounding louder than their small numbers.

New York chapter leader Tom Paladino, Alfia and 
Lipton meet with NYPD Captain Woody Selover before 
the Sunday march. Selover promises protection but 
keeps the Warriors out of the march.
Ken Howard
New York chapter leader Tom Paladino, Alfia and Lipton meet with NYPD Captain Woody Selover before the Sunday march. Selover promises protection but keeps the Warriors out of the march.
As soon as the Protest Warriors infiltrated Sunday's 
anti-Bush, antiwar march, the peaceful demonstration 
turned ugly when "anarchists," including the man in the 
black T-shirt and bandanna, began tearing down the 
Warriors' signs and swinging at the counterprotesters 
carrying them.
Ken Howard
As soon as the Protest Warriors infiltrated Sunday's anti-Bush, antiwar march, the peaceful demonstration turned ugly when "anarchists," including the man in the black T-shirt and bandanna, began tearing down the Warriors' signs and swinging at the counterprotesters carrying them.

"These freedom-haters think they can come here and spit on the Statue of Liberty," Lipton yells. "They're going to be taught an important lesson. They have to come through us first."

"Protest Warriors," Alfia hollers. "Let's roll!"


Earlier in the morning, Selover had said the NYPD had made some 300 arrests leading up to the UPJ march -- a relatively small number thus far. Again and again the Protest Warriors swear they want no trouble and that they're more peaceful than the patchouli peaceniks who really want to overthrow the government. In a little while, they will have their chance to prove themselves.

For several blocks, the Warriors march and chant, with the curious and the furious trying to pass by without getting trampled on. Some passersby mutter insults, a few scream their support, most couldn't give a shit.

The Warriors' chants of "John effin' Kerry, no effin' way!" and "Four more years!" die as quickly as they start. At one intersection, a young Warrior, who looks under 18 but doesn't offer up his age, yells, "Hey, communist shit-heel!" He is asked to whom he was directing the comment.

"I'm just throwing epithets around hoping they stick," he says. "There are enough pinkos around."

After about 20 minutes, the group arrives at its destination: the location of Whole Foods Market's Manhattan outpost. The Warriors are greeted by the sound of bongos and Clash songs and anti-Bush chants and the sight of tie-dyed peaceniks dancing in the streets (standing, actually, considering the parade's moving at a snail's pace).

A banner hangs over the Whole Foods sign: "MY BUSH SMELLS LIKE SHIT."

Here, the Warriors believe their police escorts will insert them into the demonstration. Instead, the officers keep the Warriors about 30 yards away from the protest. They're dead in the water. To Lipton, it appears as though Selover's offer to protect the Warriors was a ruse to muzzle them.

"I'm really hoping the NYPD will let us right on top of them," he says, his voice rising and cracking as he sees the marchers pass them by. "I mean, c'mon, let us at them. Why are they holding us back here?"

A reporter suggests it's for their protection.

"No, it's for their protection," Lipton says, angry now. "We have the right to protest them. I don't know why they wanna set up all these barricades. It's ridiculous."

Some of the anti-Bush protesters begin to notice the Warriors; they see their signs and believe, for a moment, they're on their side but being kept out of the march. Some scream at the cops to let them in; others just stand and squint, trying to figure out who the hell they are. Once they figure it out, they stop and smile, more amused than anything else. For a while, it's no more heated than the exchange of shouted slogans:

"Four more years! Four more years!"

"No more years! No more years!"

The Protest Warriors get what they came for. Suddenly, media mikes are being shoved into faces, as reporters are happy to find a different angle to what's quickly becoming a dull story. They will make the nightly news in New York City and grab a little ink and cyberspace in newspapers.

Standing in the gap between them, you can almost feel the hate radiating from both groups. This tiny area feels like a gaping canyon neither group is willing to jump over or crawl through. Both sides insist they welcome debate, but all they do is shout at each other. The preachers will not be converted.

Finally, the Warriors have had enough of being penned up. Alfia, Lipton and Paladino order them to disperse and head further up the protest to infiltrate the anti-Bush throng. Rob Garcia, a former army medic who returned from Iraq in April, leads one of the groups. He's dressed in his khaki camouflage gear, with a black beret; he carries his medical gear in a black bag over his shoulder, just in case, God forbid.


The Protest Warriors crash the protest at 26th Street and Seventh Avenue. At first, no one notices. Their signs are pointed toward the front so that people behind them can't see, and in this human traffic jam no one's turning around to notice. But then a young woman with blond hair begins yelling to one of the Warriors, "Can you explain your sign? I don't get it." The Warriors ignore her and keep moving.

An older gentleman wearing a "When Clinton lied, no one died" button sees them and smiles. "I think their signs are meaningless, hilarious. They don't confuse me. They're trivial." He laughs. "It's like a dog barking at the moon and the moon could give a shit." But then boos begin, and chants of "Fuck you! Get out of our march! Get off our streets!" Just like that it gets ugly.

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