This Week's Day-by-Day Picks

Thursday, September 29
You lost your innocence in the backseat of a beat-up Chevy Blazer at 16. Aside from your scandalous diary entry, nary a thing was afire. Chava, the protagonist of the film Innocent Voices, on the other hand, lost his at age 11, heralded by the eerie reverberation of gunshots across the playground. Set in El Salvador in the 1980s when civil war ravaged the country and its people, the film recounts Chava's struggle to cling to innocence in the midst of dispiriting violence and a daily struggle for survival -- while coping with the growing pains of first love. MECA presents a free screening at 7:30 p.m. Angelika Film Center, 510 Texas. For tickets, call 713-802-9370 or visit www.innocentvoicesmovie.com. Free.

The fashion-forward folks from Something Social know that Houston's poised to be a major player on the fashion scene. So they've put together the Tailored By You Fashion Show, which spotlights 18 fresh designers, who'll be showcasing their creations on the catwalk. Catch the hot local designers before they're all overpriced at Neiman's at 9 p.m. Dean's Credit Clothing, 316 Main. For information, visit www.somethingsocial.org/tailored. Free.

Friday, September 30
Your landlord called your Montrose studio "cozy." You called it cramped, and from the moment you carefully mounted your poster reminding you to "Hang in There," you realized how the space surrounding you impacted your comfort and sense of well-being. In "Critical Space," artist Andrea Zittel explores urban existence, along with myths about autonomy and freedom; her three-dimensional, modeled domestic settings draw on architecture and geography. From her podlike wagon stations to her customized escape vehicle, this exhibit puts IKEA to shame. Opens at 9 p.m. today and runs through January 1. Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, 5216 Montrose. For information, call 713-284-8250 or visit www.camh.org. Free.

IKEA this ain't: Andrea Zittel examines urban living in 
"Critical Space." See Friday.
Courtesy of the CAM
IKEA this ain't: Andrea Zittel examines urban living in "Critical Space." See Friday.
IKEA this ain't: Andrea Zittel examines urban living in 
"Critical Space." See Friday.
Courtesy of the CAM
IKEA this ain't: Andrea Zittel examines urban living in "Critical Space." See Friday.

Saturday, October 1
It's not Thanksgiving yet, but it's never too early to savor the delectable taste of Turkey. No need to travel 9,000 miles, though -- TurkFest 2005 is bringing it to you. Not only can you get your fill of Turkish Shadow Theater (really, though, is there ever enough?), but you can settle in for an afternoon of paper marbling and folk- and belly dancing before grabbing a bit of doner kebab for dinner. Wash it down with some Turkish wine. Sample some baklava. Repeat. Then take a listen to the Turkish pop bands. Maybe they'll play "Billy, Don't Be a Gyro." The fun starts at 11 a.m. Jones Plaza, 600 Louisiana. For information, visit www.atahouston.org. Free.

Every girl will be crazy for these sharp-dressed, er, women, when the Austin Dragsters, a grassroots collective of drag king performers, present A Night at Club Eve. They'll be swaggering like sex machines, strutting like stallions and generally dripping machismo. They know just how to please a woman, and we're supposed to believe they're men? No way, Josie. Proceeds from the Dragsters' Houston debut will benefit the International Drag King Extravaganza in Austin next year, in case you just can't get enough of these men who aren't. The gender-bending begins at 9:30 p.m. 2205 Richmond. For information, call 713-523-3837. $5.

Sunday, October 2
Eternally socially conscious group Voices Breaking Boundaries is showcasing a night of the indigenous women in Chiapas, Mexico. Today, if you've been wondering what the ladies of Chiapas are up to, you can check out Arie Hidalgo and Carolina Herrera's documentary, Antzetik lom tulan chi'x yayic: Women with Strong Blood, as well as artwork by a variety of Chiapan women's groups and a presentation by Christine Kovic, co-author of Women of Chiapas: Making History in Times of Struggle and Hope, which follows women who create weaving cooperatives to establish fair trade and women's rights. Be sure to check out the homemade refreshments and the mariachi band. 7 p.m. DiverseWorks, 1117 East Freeway. For tickets, call 713-524-7821 or visit www.voicesbreakingboundaries.org. $5.

Monday, October 3
Like Fish Swimming Through Rock spotlights three pivotal days in two women's 20-year friendship and the only challenge they couldn't beat together: the grim realities of terminal cancer. Written by Houstonian Lane Devereux in memory of her late friend, Fish Swimming unflinchingly celebrates life through the lens of death. BYOK (Kleenex, that is). The show opens at 7:30 p.m. Friday, September 30, and runs through October 8. Barnevelder Movement/Arts Complex, 2201 Preston. For other showtimes and tickets, call 281-373-9658 or visit www.barnevelder.org. Pay what you will today; $12 all other days. Ten percent of the proceeds goes to Making Strides Against Breast Cancer's 5K Walk.

Tuesday, October 4
When was the last time you had a night of good sax? Yeah, us either, but take heart. Spyro Gyra will take you to that happy place -- Off the Deep End. This, the group's 27th album, colorfully bears witness to the broad range of styles -- R&B, Latin, Brazilian, pop, pop-fusion -- that the powerhouse group, hailed as pioneers of contemporary jazz, has been bringing to the scene for nearly three decades. Not a bad rap for a band whose humble beginning was in a Buffalo night club, where they inadvertently named themselves after a type of pond scum. Spyro Gyra gives it up at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Sambuca, 909 Texas. For tickets, call 713-224-5299 or visit www.sambucarestaurant.com. $30.

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