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"Regine Schumann: Chameleon" Regine Schumann's fluorescent Plexiglas boxes may have a subtle glow during the day, but under black light, they look like they've been plugged in. Schumann combines planes of vividly colored Plexi to create her wall-mounted works. They're well-crafted, but aside from the very cool luminosity factor, most of the forms rely on standard geometric shapes. Still, there are a couple of very interesting standouts in which Schumann is taking expected squares and rectangles and ever-so-slightly warping the sides in or out. The best is a large square in a radiant "safety orange." Schumann has curved the sides outward so slightly that you keep wondering if it is an optical illusion. Subtle alterations like these give the work a very interesting edge. Through May 7. Gallery Sonja Roesch, 2309 Caroline Street, 713-659-5424. — KK

Location Info

Map

Museum Of Fine Arts, Houston

1001 Bissonnet St.
Houston, TX 77004

Category: Museums

Region: Kirby-West U

Lawndale Art Center

4912 Main St.
Houston, TX 77002

Category: Art Galleries

Region: Downtown/ Midtown

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

5216 Montrose Blvd.
Houston, TX 77006

Category: Museums

Region: Montrose

Gallery Sonja Roesch

2309 Caroline St.
Houston, TX 77004

Category: Art Galleries

Region: Third Ward

The Menil Collection

1515 Sul Ross
Houston, TX 77006

Category: Art Galleries

Region: Montrose

"The Whole World Was Watching: Civil Rights-Era Photographs" This selection of photography from a collection given to the Menil by Edmund Carpenter and Adelaide de Menil documents the civil rights struggles of the late '50s and early '60s, when the exhibit's title phrase, "The Whole World Was Watching," was adopted by activists and political groups as a rallying cry for change. It refers, of course, to the advent of television and the ability for wide dissemination of images depicting racial injustice in the southern United States. The exhibit documents the signs of segregation, the presence of the KKK, battles with law enforcement and the cruel practice of blasting protesters with water from high-pressure fire hoses, and it also displays the nonviolent marches, moments of solidarity and other images that embody the race relations of the times, as seen through the lenses of six photographers. Bruce L. Davidson's Woman being held by two policemen captures a protester being detained in front of a movie theater whose marquee adds intriguing commentary to the image. A young African-American man in whiteface, with the word "vote" written across his forehead, marches in another photo by Davidson. And Martin Luther King Jr. happily shakes hands with women from his car in Leonard Freed's image Maryland. They're just a few of the extraordinary images on display. Through September 25. Menil Collection, 1515 Sul Ross, 713-525-9400. — TS

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