Top

dining

Stories

 

Bootsie's Kicks Butt

Tomball restaurant offering a culinary experience unlike any other.

A marinated snapper appetizer continued to escalate my dining party's expectations for the evening. The fish was plated in mounds with a slight sheen of marinade. The first bite started as chilly and pleasantly sweet, then gave way to a delicate underscoring of the sansyo pepper. One of my friends commented, "They could just give me a bowl of this and call it an evening."

The kohlrabi (German turnip) vichyssoise perched atop small pieces of chorizo was my favorite dish of the evening. The dollop of whipped concoction was aerated with nitrous oxide, resulting in a delicate structure and corresponding consistency that evaporated on the tongue, leaving behind only flavor and a realization that the dish was a masterful example of molecular gastronomy.

Other standout dishes from the Heritage Dinner were the garden potpourri flatbread and the grilled quail. The relative simplicity of the sliced flatbread was a nice departure from the prior complex creations. However, the taste was no less rich, with generous cuts of lardo combining with greens to create a warm, savory dish. The grilled quail was also pretty straightforward. Tender and juicy, it was presented atop a bed of delicate carrots.

Intriguing and delicious: The chicken-fried rabbit.
Troy Fields
Intriguing and delicious: The chicken-fried rabbit.

Location Info

Map

Bootsie's Heritage Cafe

112 Commerce St.
Tomball, TX 77375

Category: Restaurant > Gourmet

Region: Outside Houston

Details

Hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays.
Chicken-fried rabbit: $14
3rd Coast Fish & Chips: $14
Cheese board: $11
Zucchini & basil soup: $4
Heritage Dinner, ten courses with wine pairing: $75
3rd Coast Dinner, six courses: $35; nine courses: $55


READ MORE:
Slideshow: Third Coast Cooking at Bootsie's Heritage Cafe.


Bootsie's Heritage Cafe
112 Commerce St. in Tomball, 281-516-9699.

Related Stories

More About

Two desserts closed the evening. The first was a lemon-lime mousse and a bit of apple cake prepared by Chef Chris Leung, a well-balanced offering of tart and sweet. The texture of the cake structure evoked thoughts of pie apples and crust, but without the associated syrupy goo or over-the-top sugar. Fresh pickled berries from Bootsie's farm followed, served atop a coriander ganache and peanut butter. The berries were certainly pleasant, but my companions and I were more focused on the combination of peanut butter and ganache.

While the Heritage Dinner is a special event, the Bootsie's 3rd Coast Dinner is available any night the restaurant's open (reservations are recommended) and is not a large departure from the Heritage Dinner approach. This iteration comes in six-course ($35) and nine-course ($55) offerings that evolve based on availability of locally procured ingredients. Wine pairings are also available, as is the full menu of libations.

The evening I tried the 3rd Coast Dinner, my table enjoyed a menu highlighted by ravioli of Hill Country rabbit, crisp confit of Muscovy duck, 3rd Coast sea bream and dark chocolate frozen parfait. To drink we had Matanzas Creek Sauvignon Blanc ($13 a glass; $50 a bottle), Piraat Ale ($8) and Southern Star Bombshell Blonde ($5). The meal was fantastic.

Is driving to Tomball for the food at Bootsie's worth it? Absolutely. In fact, even though I've been there three times in two weeks, I'd like to return there for dinner tonight.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
12 comments
Hormonefest
Hormonefest

What! no reaction from Alison Cook's twitt-fit? She scolded the Press about this review...much like the wonderful, loving marm she has become.

Neighthundred
Neighthundred

Houston Press, why don't you find some more educated reviewers. A lot of work and education is put into the food. How about the same amount of work put into the review?

Guest
Guest

The Rucker Rollers can cook, but this review is crap. "My advice is not to spoon too quickly through the soup, but rather let each spoonful spread across your palate and recede down your throat so that the subtle flavors have time to unfold"? This is ridiculous writing. Not to mention that in the print version the writer uses the incorrect "palette." Also, one measly paragraph dedicated to the front of the house? An honest food critic would critique the FOH rather than say nothing in order to avoid saying anything bad; most diners want to know about the whole experience (ambiance, service), not just the food.Also, I second EN's explanation of cooking rabbit... Food writers are supposed to know about food, right? Seems like there's a glut of food writers at the Press now. Remember when Robb Walsh could almost single-handedly handle the responsibility - and do it well? Quality, not quantity, Houston Press...

EN
EN

I'm sure a quick call to Chef Rucker about the rabbit would've provided you with everything you needed to know. Domesticated rabbit is not that much tougher than duck and does not need "hours and hours" in a pressure cooker! The back legs were most likely cooked slowly (I'm betting Sous Vide) and THEN breaded and fried. Brining, does not make meat more tender, it changes the texture slighlty and flavors the meat. If you just brine and then bread and fry rabbit legs, I guarantee you will get tough-as-boots meat.

Redwing
Redwing

Excellent Review! Your descriptions made my mouth water and the laid back atmosphere is what I like, no pretense, just Down home comfort. Rabbit, Quail, Salmon all sound great to try when all are prepared in such delicious ways by "the experts" of this inviting place. I plan to put Bootsie's on my list of 'must try restaurants' when I make my trip from Ky. down. Bootsie's got my vote on a fare well done! Thanks for the advance info on this "uncommonly good" Houston Restaurant.

Lucrece Borrego
Lucrece Borrego

Great review. The "think of the cuisine as your Maw-Maw's cooking, tinged with a heaping spoonful of sophistication and correspondingly complex flavors" reflects my first take on Bootsie's a year ago when I summed it up similarly as "as though someone sent a well-seasoned southern grandmother off to apprentice in a European Michelin-starred kitchen for a year" in my first review (which I realize now, needs an updating badly) on Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/bootsi... where you will find some oddly negative reviews that oh-so-not coincidentally contain some hilarious misspellings of what I thought were common terms.

houstonhead
houstonhead

Randy knows what he is doing, Bootsie's is allsome but now that it's all happening you need to prepare yourself for sensory overload. We're just stoked to be in cahoots with the mad scientist,er chef, er panichead, or whatever the hell you want to call him.

Debjgee
Debjgee

Enjoyed your review. Love Bootsie's. I think I may have been there the same night you were at the 3rd Coast dinner as the menu sounds exactly like the one I had that night!

Bruce R
Bruce R

Piraat. I'm impressed. Not used to see beers that actually pair well with food.

jle
jle

Loved the article. I'm a fan of Bootsie's. It's a destination restaurant, no doubt. But with the quality and creativity of dishes coming out of the kitchen, it's more economical than flying to New York or San Fran for top-notch food.

South West
South West

"Palette" is something you use to paint from, or a range of colors. "Palate" is that thing in your mouth, or your sense of taste on a large scale.

 
Loading...