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Yummy Stinky

The fermented tofu at this Taiwanese spot is not for the faint of heart.

It could also be the fact that aside from serving great food, Yummy Kitchen might have the friendliest customer service in Chinatown. The owner is almost always behind the counter with an engaging smile and a willingness to walk neophytes through the menu. The restaurant takes credit and debit cards. And the menu has English descriptions for all its dishes.

Even better, an enormous meal for four here will run you perhaps $35. That's inclusive of tax and no tip is required, as you order at the counter and help yourself to soft drinks, plates, utensils and some of Yummy's hot and sour soup, which serves as a communal appetizer. (Though, to be fair, it's only sporting to leave a few dollars on the table for your busboy.)

My parents and I enjoyed one of those enormous meals recently, filling the table with General Tso's chicken, ma-pow tofu, crispy-bottomed pork dumplings and plenty more. No blood, tofu or cuttlefish landed on the table this time, something the friendly Taiwanese woman — who never forgets a face — teased me about.

If you fear stinky tofu, try the gua bao (back).
Troy Fields
If you fear stinky tofu, try the gua bao (back).

Location Info

Map

Yummy Kitchen

9326 Bellaire Blvd.
Houston, TX 77036

Category: Restaurant > Taiwanese

Region: Outer Loop - SW

Details

Hours: 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. daily.
Ma-pow tofu: $5.95
General Tso's chicken: $7.95
Pan-fried pork dumplings: $4.95
Steamed pork buns: $3.95
Stinky tofu: $3.95
Cuttlefish in brown sauce: $7.95
Intestines with ginger: $7.95


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"Last time you were here, you order all Taiwanese food!" she chuckled. "Today you order all American stuff!" I didn't want to explain to her that my parents were already angry at me for subjecting them to Nicki Minaj on the car ride over to Chinatown ("Y'all need to hear what the kids are listening to these days!") and were in no mood for stinky tofu.

In fact, the last time I'd had stinky tofu, I brought some home for them to try. My mother helplessly spit it back out into the trash, while my dad seemed despondently angry at the manure-scented tofu itself. "Why would you eat that?" he asked, exasperated with us both.

This visit, they were both more than content with the food I'd ordered. My dad waxed poetically about how the General Tso's chicken reminded him of an old Chinese restaurant downtown that had served the best butterflied shrimp in a similar sauce. And it was good stuff, tangy sweet and ever-so-slightly spicy. I appreciated the bounty of bright green, steamed broccoli that was served with it, too.

Meanwhile, I had graduated from scooping out individual portions of the ma-pow tofu onto my plate and had begun eating it straight from the casserole dish. The tofu inside seemed slightly fermented, too, although without the trademark pungency. Ground pork mingled with the cubes in a ruddy sauce that was dappled with ginger and scallions. It didn't have that trademark heat or numbness that comes from true Sichuan-style ma-pow tofu, but I loved it nevertheless.

And as soon as the gua bao hit the table, I divided them eagerly for my parents. "You're going to love these," I promised. "It's like bacon's beefier cousin." The buns were a huge hit, gone in a heartbeat.

But just as dinner was looking to have been a total success, the scent of stinky tofu began wafting through the air. My dad smelled it first, then grabbed his temple. The smell was starting to give him a headache. We packed up the rest of our food, finished for the evening anyway, and got up to leave.

The friendly owner stopped by the table before we left. "You smell that, huh?" she laughed. "Sorry. They ordered stinky tofu hot pot. Much stinkier than the fried stuff you eat." We departed, chuckling as well, with the odor of barnyard stalls thick in our nostrils. But the dinner we'd had was absolutely worth every scent.

katharine.shilcutt@houstonpress.com

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17 comments
Sonama38
Sonama38

I am a Yummy Kitchen regular, and want to say they have the best Taiwanese street food in all Houston Chinatown!

Larry Katz
Larry Katz

Half the review is devoted to telling us how cool Ms. S. is for liking stinky tofu. Of course, many previous reviews have emphasized how cool she is, but this time, we find out that she is way cooler than her parents! They just don't get it!!! Could someone remind Miss Kate that we read restaurant reviews to learn about food and restaurants? Instead of propping up her self esteem by telling us how cool she is, she could do it by writing useful reviews. But alas, her knowledge of food is shallow, and her opinions of restaurants are undependable. Can't the Press do better than this?

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

In the musical, Flower Drum Song, there is a song entitled Chop Suey. In the musical, the song is sung by those in the "older generation " of Chinese imigrants in San Francisco who are confused and confounded by the Americanization of their culture by their first generation born children. The dish that was found on virtually every Chinese restaurant that was operating when Flower Drum Song was first produced and that was a mainstay on the "foreign food " isle of most grocery stores was Kung King brand's canned version of Chop Suey. From the song we learned that there is no authentic Chinese dish called chop suey, but that it was a dish made in Chinse restaurants in America to satisfy American tastes or at least what the Chinese immigrants thought were American tastes. General Tso's Chicken is a more modern dish that was also created by restauranteurs in America to satisfy American tastes or what are thought might be American tastes. If a restaurant reviewer wants to be serious about her work and considered to have some level of expertise that allows her to educate her readers about cuisines that are or can be new and exciting because they are being introduced to America as being representative of a particular culture and local, the reviewer should write about those dishes. For those interested in the history of Chinese food and its very interesting role in American culture and how American culture influenced the Chinese immigrant population I suggest the book, Fortune Cookie Chronicles by Jennifer 8. Lee that is mentioned in this article in Slate. http://www.salon.com/food/fran...

Rich
Rich

Nice review Katharine, I'm glad I had the chance to read about "stinky tofu". I'm not sure I'm going to run right out and get some, but I'm happy I have the chance to vicariously experience it through your review.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

Enough about General Tso's Chicken. General Tso's is to Chinese food as butter chicken or chicken tikka masala is to Indian food. Both are Western creations to satisfy Western tastes. It does not mean they are not good when eaten in a Chinese or Indian restaurant but such dishes should not necessarily be used to evaluate the quality of a particular ethnic restaurant that they are being served in as a classical dish of that ethnic group. I suggest if you and the family are really in desperate need of some General Tso's Chicken, go to the Lai Lai Dumpling House on Bellaire. It is one of the original Chinese restaurants on Bellaire. For about $7 you and the family can get a platter of crispy, sweet/spicy battered nuggests that sometimes even have pieces of chicken, but will always satisfy that sweet tooth.

Perhaps what you should do is devote an entire column to reviews of every Chinese food buffet and fast food place in town that has General Tso's Chicken on the menu so that we know exactly where to go for that dish and then those three words will never have to appear in a column again and you can move on to evaluating which place in town has the best sweet and sour pork.

trisch
trisch

Oh stinky tofu. Back when we were little, my dad would drag us to a Taiwanese restaurant in the Welcome Center for stinky tofu. We'd gag and suffer so much the owner would bring out a tabletop fan to fan the fumes away from us. When I was living in Sichuan a couple of years ago, I came across that familiar odor at an outdoor antiques market. "Don't worry," I told my non-Asian colleague, "one of the stalls is probably selling stinky tofu." I was wrong. What we were smelling was the cesspool of a stream flowing behind the market -- foamy, green and complete with human waste floaters. Stinky tofu. It's a huge part of my ethnic heritage, but try as I might, I haven't been able to bring myself to eat it. :(

Doc Ricky
Doc Ricky

So much to that menu beyond what is mentioned. Here are some recommendations:

1. Crispy Beef Cake. I know, the translation is hilarious, but it's good.2. The poorly named Chicken in Special Brown Sauce - this is chicken cooked in anise, ginger and garlic, served in a clay pot with Thai basil. 3. Green onion pancakes - the technique here is pretty good4. Pork in a bowl, Taichung Style - this is what Chinese would consider comfort food.

Then again, there's always the gua bao

http://food.drricky.net/2011/0...

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

No one is cooler than my parents. Especially not me. But it's always interesting to read the bizarre things that other people read into my writing. This time it's that I'm propping up my own self-esteem by trashing my badass parents who've done everything in this world for me and more. Yes, that's it!

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

Hey, hey, hey. You lay off Ms. S. She's my girl although sometimes I don't feel the love back.

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

My favorite part of this entire thing is that you have recommended a chicken-based dish to us that "sometimes even have pieces of chicken" in it.

Well done, sir or madam. Well done.

Tina
Tina

WTF? Is that all you read in the entire article - those three words? Then you went into a rant about General Tso's Chicken? Perhaps you should bother to read the entire thing and understand that she took someone along who could only handle something as pedestrian as General Tso's...so she kindly ordered it for him without judging. Man, sometimes the commentors on here seriously need remedial reading lessons.

Rich
Rich

Hey Attyrose3, I happen to like Katharine's reviews, this one included. How about when you get your own gig as a restaurant reviewer, you review whathever the heck you like. In the meantime I'm sure I'm not the only one who wishes you wouldn't be such a JERK!

Sihaya
Sihaya

#2 and #4 sound absolutely to-die-for.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

I refer you to other comments concerning this review. General Tso's Chicken is not believed to even be a dish created in Twaiwan so why would one even order it, much less devote a single word to it, in a review of a restaurant that specializes in Twianese cooking.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

The point is, it is fine to order it if that is what her father wanted. It is fine to even enjoy it. But if one is writing a review of a restaurant that specializes in a particular cuisine, one does not review a throw away dish that is on the menu to accommodate the diners who are not up for trying the house specialities. It is the equivalent of going to a restaurant geared towards adults and reviewing the children's menu items that are there for the children that the restaurant owners were hoping would never even show up in the first place. The kids food should be good but it is likely not going to be what the restaurant specializes in or why most of the customers are there for.

Biker
Biker

Um, she ordered it for her father because that's all he wanted off the menu? Help me understand why this is cause for such snippyness. Should she not have mentioned that her father wanted this dish?? Good God.

Also, what other comments about General Tso's?

One more thing, spell check is a beautiful thing...employ it and enjoy it.

 
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