8 Shows Set in Texas We Want to See Netflix Reboot

Dearest Netflix, please bring these guys back!
Dearest Netflix, please bring these guys back!

For decades, when a TV show you loved went off the air, that was it. It was over, even if it happened in the middle of the plot. Canceled is canceled. But, with streaming services like Netflix and even the glut of cable networks, shows we once thought were lost can get a reboot.

In Texas, we need look to perhaps the most popular (probably not beloved, but close) TV series in our state's history: Dallas. Even though it went off the air two decades ago, TNT managed to regurgitate three seasons of the serial drama about big oil in Big D, so we figure, why not try the same with some of our other favorite shows set in the Lone Star State?

8. Reba

Not many country singers get to take their careers from the stage to the small screen, even fewer in sitcom form. Somehow, Reba McEntire managed it for six seasons on the CW network. It wasn't groundbreaking, but we are thinking a "where are they now"-style reboot might be fun for a season or two.

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7. Cristela

This short-lived series was about a Mexican-American aspiring attorney in Dallas. It was written by Cristela Alonzo, who was born in the Valley, making her the first Latina to write and star in her own network show. Unfortunately, it lasted only one season, but it seems like the perfect show to reboot on a streaming network.

6. Rollergirls

Roller derby gained big headlines when Whip It came out, and A&E tried to capitalize with this reality series set in Austin that followed the women of the Texas Lonestar Roller Derby. It only made it to 13 episodes because of underwhelming ratings, but our bet is if they spent some time checking out the Houston roller derby scene, this would make a screaming comeback.

5. King of the Hill

Few people knew how to cut to the core of Texas like Mike Judge. The animated series set in "Arlen," Texas (think Arlington), was a remarkably accurate, if satirized, portrait of life in a middle-class east Texas suburb. We want it back, if only to see more of Bobby and hear Hank say "propane and propane accessories" one more time. 

 

4. Walker Texas Ranger

Any vehicle that allows Chuck Norris the opportunity to roundhouse kick someone seems like a good idea. Walker managed ten seasons on the air thanks to a bland, tepid approach to crime fighting your grandparents could get behind. We want to see Walker rise again, maybe a newer, kung fu badass version that takes more risks. But bring back Clarence Gilyard so he can be forced to say, "The quarterback is toast" like he did in Die Hard.

3. The Eyes of Texas

There is something we love about Texas travel shows because, let's be honest, what other state could sustain such a thing for 30 years? From 1969 to 1999, Eyes took us all over the state we call home, first with Ray Miller and then Ron Stone, all of it produced by KPRC-TV right here in Houston. We're thinking they could get Dominique Sachse to host the reboot.

2. Beavis and Butt-Head

What is more quintessentially '90s than a cartoon about two morons (from Texas) running on MTV? Mike Judge, once again, managed to capture stupid, bored teenagers blowing crap up as perfectly as possible. Rarely has there been anything more accurate than their MST3K-style music video commentary. If there was one series that needs to return, it is this one.

1. Friday Night Lights

It sort of has to come back at this point. From book to movie to one failed series followed by the NBC series that lasted five seasons on the sheer determination of fans, this ranks as one of the truly wonderful shows of the past decade. The cast alone is worth revisiting. Plus, we have to find out how Coach Tyler is doing at his new coaching gig and if he is still saying, "Let me tell you something." Texas forever!


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