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  • Article

    Peerless - Ballet's strong cast complements strong theatrical choreography

    Houston Ballet caps its spring season with a brand of theatrically rich dance that continues to set this company apart. Like Dracula, Peer Gynt features a suppressed, depraved male antihero from the 19th century who turns innocent women into victims,...

    by Cynthia Greenwood on June 17, 1999
  • Article

    Easy Target - Beauty queens make predictable satire for Pageant

    Beauty pageants, with all their silly hoopla of helmet-haired, endlessly grinning girls parading about in high heels and swimsuits, are an easy target for satire. Some might say too easy. The jokes are pretty obvious. There are the moronic speeches a...

    by Lee Williams on June 17, 1999
  • Article

    The World Made Visible - Amy Blakemore pays attention. It's high time she got some.

    The great photographer Diane Arbus once claimed that if she didn't take her pictures, no one would ever see the things she photographed. She was talking, in part at least, about the circus hermaphrodites, Sunday nudists, Russian dwarfs and shy transv...

    by Shaila Dewan on June 17, 1999
  • Article

    Out of the Woods - Cooper and her clever Tamalalia are cool enough to beat the heat

    Yes folks, it's that time again. Once a year, as certain as the glimmering glow of the summer solstice, another episode of Tamarie Cooper's kitschy, kooky ongoing and ever-changing show, Tamalalia, comes along. For the uninitiated, this hodgepod...

    by Lee Williams on June 10, 1999
  • Article

    Too Much for Words

    From the time I was six to the time I was 11, my dad worked at Texas Southern University. There, perched on a high stool in front of a computer terminal, I would play the world's earliest computer game (hangman) and print the world's earliest compute...

    by Shaila Dewan on June 10, 1999
  • Article

    Great Expectations - Sometimes the hype hurts

    Public relations is a dangerous business. The name of the game, of course, is creating a buzz -- but too much pre-performance excitement means the real thing can't possibly live up to expectations. With world premieres by both Glen Tetley and Li...

    by Lauren Kern on June 3, 1999
  • Article

    Bawdiness and Brains - Tom Stoppard's Travesties offers both

    Anyone who has been to the movies lately has probably seen playwright Tom Stoppard's work. His award-winning Shakespeare In Love filled the screen with luscious images and intricate verbal play. But as smart as the film is, it doesn't begin to reveal...

    by Lee Williams on June 3, 1999
  • Article

    Rich. Beautiful. And Bored.

    Nobel Prize-winning playwright George Bernard Shaw was ahead of his time in most every way. Born in 1856, he was a strict vegetarian, a socialist and a fighter for women's rights. His vast body of work (it includes such plays as Pygmalion, Major Barb...

    by Lee Williams on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Canyons and Cowboys

    Charles Mary Kubricht begins her paintings of the Grand Canyon with photographs -- a vista that she liked during a hike, perhaps. Then she paints those scenes on wood panels -- as few as two or as many as 49 -- and puts them together like a perceptua...

    by Susie Kalil on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Study in Green - People love Thomas Kinkade, the Painter of Light. Is that a problem?

    It was a certain morbid curiosity that drew us, two artists and me, to the Westin Galleria one afternoon in late March to witness a personal appearance by California painter Thomas Kinkade, variously known as America's most collected artist, the only...

    by Shaila Dewan on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Mooning the '50s - Themes are the only problem for this polished production

    Stages' production of Hugh Herbert's 1951 script The Moon Is Blue is fast, funny and flawless. William Hardy's expansive direction is rich with sophisticated nuance and impeccable timing. John Gow's retro set is gorgeous. And best of all, the small c...

    by Lee Williams on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Light but Likable

    The Last Session, Steve Schalchlin and Jim Brochu's musical about AIDS, is likable, sentimental and absolute fluff. Full of melodrama, tearful songs and witty irony, the show somehow manages to reduce the devastating disease to a two-hour Hallmark mo...

    by Lee Williams on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Abstraction Made Personal - You don't look at Sam Reveles's paintings. You look through them.

    Sam Reveles's hot-blooded, sensual paintings and drawings put you through a grueling emotional workout. Just as you've submitted to the deep melancholy of one, the next yanks you into anguish, and the one beside that, into ecstatic jubilation. The ri...

    by Susie Kalil on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Splendid Spider - Masquerade's musical builds magical web

    Manuel Puig's novel Kiss of the Spider Woman tells a haunting love story, the kind that can happen only under the most wretched of circumstances. Terrence McNally, along with John Kander and Fred Ebb, has turned this dark tale about two men who meet ...

    by Lee Williams on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Roots of Rice

    As much as Houstonians might love our Rice University -- those gigantic oaks, the library with its glossy waxed floors and those smart, serious-minded students -- learning the genesis of the grand old place sounds about as interesting as a bowl of Di...

    by Lee Williams on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Dear Abbey - Main Street does right by this Austen charmer

    Sir Walter Scott wrote that novelist Jane Austen's "exquisite touch ... renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting." Such is the case with her earliest manuscript, Northanger Abbey, about the girlish tribulations of 17-year-old Ca...

    by Lee Williams on May 6, 1999
  • Article

    Drums of Injustice - Ensemble shows civil rights era through mental patients

    The civil rights movement played out in the streets of urban America. And TV cameras rolled, forever capturing the violence accompanying that fight. But some of that crusade happened far from the public eye, in small, intimate places, involving the m...

    by Lee Williams on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    The Poetry Winners

    So this dirty, sultry, apartment-hived swamp of a city breathes and seethes life after all. The call went out and you responded. We wanted poetry, we got it. By the truckload. The blues was the first bona fide American poetic form, and a po...

    by Liz Belile on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Object Lesson

    For a while now I've been mentally mapping out what I call my Color Tour of Houston, a project whose merit I hope our Convention and Visitors Bureau will come to recognize as a celebration of the diversity of the city's taste in paint. There's the bu...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Tennessee Visit - Little Room explores Williams

    Tennessee Williams might easily be remembered as the greatest American playwright of the 20th century. His characters are beautifully spoken poetic beings, the sort who utter great truths even as they fly into the flames of their own destruction. Wil...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
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MFAH and the Menil Are Depriving Us of Local Art MFAH and the Menil Are Depriving Us of Local Art

Perhaps our Houston art museums have forgotten where they are. How else to explain the pitiful showing of Houston-made art in their galleries? Of the thousands of objects currently on… More >>

Capsule Art Reviews: April 24, 2014

"The Age of Impressionism: Great French Paintings from the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute" These days, Impressionist exhibitions are the art museum version of the ballet The Nutcracker: frothy… More >>

Capsule Stage Reviews: April 24, 2014

Anna Christie Eugene O'Neill's drama about seafaring men, and their women on shore, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1922, and a 2011 production in London won the Olivier Award as… More >>

Lost Language and Vaccinations

Dear Mexican, Our grandparents came from Mexico. The entire next generation spoke Spanish. However, in my generation, pretty much none of us do. One cousin's daughter does because the cousin married… More >>

Das Rheingold Is a Golden Start for HGO Das Rheingold Is a Golden Start for HGO

Well, it's finally arrived! The "it" in question is, of course, Richard Wagner's monumental operatic myth, The Ring of the Nibelung. The four-part epic, being staged by Houston Grand Opera over a… More >>

Capsule Art Reviews: April 17, 2014

"The Age of Impressionism: Great French Paintings from the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute" These days, Impressionist exhibitions are the art museum version of the ballet The Nutcracker: frothy… More >>

Capsule Stage Reviews: April 17, 2014

Anna Christie Eugene O'Neill's drama about seafaring men, and their women on shore, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1922, and a 2011 production in London won the Olivier Award as… More >>

Special Italian Edition

Dear Mexican, I like reading your articles — they are funny, sad, insightful, crude, serious and even a little provocative and antagonizing at times. One thing I find a little antagonizing… More >>

Linguistics and Mexican LoJack Linguistics and Mexican LoJack

Dear Mexican, Even though throughout the years since I came to the U.S. 20 years ago I have seen it happening with less frequency, the use by Mexicans of the expression… More >>

Capsule Art Reviews: April 10, 2014

"The Age of Impressionism: Great French Paintings from the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute" These days, Impressionist exhibitions are the art museum version of the ballet The Nutcracker: frothy… More >>

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