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  • Article

    Object Lesson

    For a while now I've been mentally mapping out what I call my Color Tour of Houston, a project whose merit I hope our Convention and Visitors Bureau will come to recognize as a celebration of the diversity of the city's taste in paint. There's the bu...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Tennessee Visit - Little Room explores Williams

    Tennessee Williams might easily be remembered as the greatest American playwright of the 20th century. His characters are beautifully spoken poetic beings, the sort who utter great truths even as they fly into the flames of their own destruction. Wil...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Tender But Timid

    Athol Fugard's Valley Song, at Stages, addresses the struggles of a young black woman who lives in post-apartheid South Africa. Veronica (Melita Hawkins) is barely out of school and full of dreams. She yearns for a life outside her little town of Nie...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Class Over Kin - The melodrama Blood Brothers bonds with music

    British playwright Willy Russell's musical Blood Brothers is a brooding melodrama about magic, superstition and the dark divide of class. The play opens on an ominous scene. Gray light covers the stage. Starlight winks above. Foreboding and sorrowful...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    A Stitch in Time - Shows by Jane Miller and Cecilia Vicuna reveal a common thread

    To fully experience "Time Not Wasted," Jane Miller's installation at Rice University Art Gallery, you must carefully step around scattered floor "paintings" and audiotape "rugs," climb onto a 20-foot bed with a knotted muslin spread, walk around an o...

    by Susie Kalil on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Wilde Times

    Oscar Wilde was a larger-than-life writer, full of flamboyant, witty swagger. To critics who dared question the morality of his work, he famously declared, "There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. T...

    by Lee Williams on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Bay Area Ballet

    Ballet productions of Giselle seethe with secrecy, deception, vengeance and torture. A peasant girl goes mad when she discovers her lover is secretly engaged to another. Frenzied, she grabs his sword and kills herself. Desperate spirits of jilted bri...

    by Cynthia Greenwood on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Remaining Calm

    When the new year began, you couldn't go anywhere without hearing about Y2K. Even daily newspapers and the Red Cross were advising people to hoard water, food and cash. Y2K is closer now than it was then, but most of the daily reminders brought on by...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    Talk About Love and Hate - IBP's witty Marie and Bruce takes a hard look at language

    Lots of folks know Wallace Shawn's acting. He has played everyone from the sardonic whining Vayna in Vayna on 42nd Street to the balding, nerdy high school teacher in Clueless. But as funny as his closet of strange performances is, Shawn's writing i...

    by Lee Williams on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    Ensemble Reassembles

    Heads have rolled at The Ensemble Theatre. In the fall, the theater's board fired advertising coordinator Margie Beegle. Shortly thereafter, education and touring coordinator Adrian Porter quit. And in February, the board told Eileen Morris -- the th...

    by Lee Williams on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    Tour de Farce - Accidental Death brings lively fun

    Farce is a dying art. Too much inane TV has all but killed it. Thankfully, Dario Fo, the playwright whose irreverent loopy genius earned him a Nobel Prize for literature, is still around to show us how it's done. Without a doubt, Accidental Death of ...

    by Lee Williams on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    Domestic Disturbance - If you rearrange the furniture, do you become someone else?

    It is fitting that the new installation at the Menil Collection has, as its core creators, a family: Lars Lerup, dean of the Rice University School of Architecture (RSA); painter Sohela Farokhi, his wife; and their ten-year-old son and Lego-master, D...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    Bolshoi Beauty - Ballet rises on the toes of a Russian icon

    To maniacal ballet lovers, true ballerinas have a rare essence that sets them apart. Maybe it's their aura of feminine purity or the quintessence of classical technique. Perhaps it's the way their feet whisper on pointe. Or how they float through all...

    by Cynthia Greenwood on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Drawing: A Blank - The CAM can't get a line on lines

    Everyone complains about exhibits predicated on regionalism, and they are indeed silly: "Four Old Texas Sculptors Whose Rich Collectors Agreed to Underwrite a Show," "Twenty Young Texas Painters Who Flirted with the Curator When He Came By Their Stud...

    by Shaila Dewan on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Flattened Fellini - A stiff Nine comes up short on fun and fantasy

    Nine, by Arthur Kopit and Maury Yeston, won best musical and four other Tonys in 1982. Perhaps the adulation had as much to do with Tommy Tune's direction as it did with the musical itself, because the Main Street Theater production is a flat-footed ...

    by Lee Williams on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Snow Outing - Little Room does right with agay classic

    Jane Chambers broke new ground when she wrote A Late Snow 25 years ago. Her very old-fashioned love story put a new spin on the woes and worries of amour. For though lesbians have always been here, few authors were brave enough in 1974 to give them a...

    by Lee Williams on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Forever Fresh - Four decades don't diminish the bite of Albee's one-act plays

    Two of Edward Albee's earliest one-acts, The American Dream and The Zoo Story, have been pulled from the shelf and dusted off for the Alley's Neuhaus Arena Stage. This stunning pair explains why Albee has become an icon of the American theater. These...

    by Lee Williams on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Fools Dive In

    Bobbindoctrin Puppet Theatre has hit the (relative) big time. After three years of putting on charmingly crude and not-suitable-for-children short shows at bars and underground arts events, the puppet people took a giant leap toward a broader audienc...

    by Lauren Kern on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Friendship in a Box

    In 1915 artist Marcel Duchamp arrived in New York, where he would turn himself into a work of art and invent the future of American art. The sophisticated Frenchman had set himself the ambitious goal of making art from nonart, and with his "readymade...

    by Susie Kalil on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Abyss of the Ages - Kindertransport sends insights on historical suffering

    Between 1938 and 1940, 10,000 Jewish children were saved from the horrors of the Third Reich. Sent out of Germany by their parents to the relative safety of unknown sponsor families, these children survived what their parents did not. This exodus -- ...

    by Lee Williams on March 11, 1999
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