<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  152  |  ...  |  304  |  ...  |  456  |  ...  |  586  |  587  |  588  |  ...  |  608  |  ...  |  610  |  Next Page >> 11721 - 11740 of 12199

  • Article

    Rich. Beautiful. And Bored.

    Nobel Prize-winning playwright George Bernard Shaw was ahead of his time in most every way. Born in 1856, he was a strict vegetarian, a socialist and a fighter for women's rights. His vast body of work (it includes such plays as Pygmalion, Major Barb...

    by Lee Williams on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Canyons and Cowboys

    Charles Mary Kubricht begins her paintings of the Grand Canyon with photographs -- a vista that she liked during a hike, perhaps. Then she paints those scenes on wood panels -- as few as two or as many as 49 -- and puts them together like a perceptua...

    by Susie Kalil on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Study in Green - People love Thomas Kinkade, the Painter of Light. Is that a problem?

    It was a certain morbid curiosity that drew us, two artists and me, to the Westin Galleria one afternoon in late March to witness a personal appearance by California painter Thomas Kinkade, variously known as America's most collected artist, the only...

    by Shaila Dewan on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Mooning the '50s - Themes are the only problem for this polished production

    Stages' production of Hugh Herbert's 1951 script The Moon Is Blue is fast, funny and flawless. William Hardy's expansive direction is rich with sophisticated nuance and impeccable timing. John Gow's retro set is gorgeous. And best of all, the small c...

    by Lee Williams on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Light but Likable

    The Last Session, Steve Schalchlin and Jim Brochu's musical about AIDS, is likable, sentimental and absolute fluff. Full of melodrama, tearful songs and witty irony, the show somehow manages to reduce the devastating disease to a two-hour Hallmark mo...

    by Lee Williams on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Abstraction Made Personal - You don't look at Sam Reveles's paintings. You look through them.

    Sam Reveles's hot-blooded, sensual paintings and drawings put you through a grueling emotional workout. Just as you've submitted to the deep melancholy of one, the next yanks you into anguish, and the one beside that, into ecstatic jubilation. The ri...

    by Susie Kalil on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Splendid Spider - Masquerade's musical builds magical web

    Manuel Puig's novel Kiss of the Spider Woman tells a haunting love story, the kind that can happen only under the most wretched of circumstances. Terrence McNally, along with John Kander and Fred Ebb, has turned this dark tale about two men who meet ...

    by Lee Williams on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Roots of Rice

    As much as Houstonians might love our Rice University -- those gigantic oaks, the library with its glossy waxed floors and those smart, serious-minded students -- learning the genesis of the grand old place sounds about as interesting as a bowl of Di...

    by Lee Williams on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Dear Abbey - Main Street does right by this Austen charmer

    Sir Walter Scott wrote that novelist Jane Austen's "exquisite touch ... renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting." Such is the case with her earliest manuscript, Northanger Abbey, about the girlish tribulations of 17-year-old Ca...

    by Lee Williams on May 6, 1999
  • Article

    Drums of Injustice - Ensemble shows civil rights era through mental patients

    The civil rights movement played out in the streets of urban America. And TV cameras rolled, forever capturing the violence accompanying that fight. But some of that crusade happened far from the public eye, in small, intimate places, involving the m...

    by Lee Williams on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    The Poetry Winners

    So this dirty, sultry, apartment-hived swamp of a city breathes and seethes life after all. The call went out and you responded. We wanted poetry, we got it. By the truckload. The blues was the first bona fide American poetic form, and a po...

    by Liz Belile on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Object Lesson

    For a while now I've been mentally mapping out what I call my Color Tour of Houston, a project whose merit I hope our Convention and Visitors Bureau will come to recognize as a celebration of the diversity of the city's taste in paint. There's the bu...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Tennessee Visit - Little Room explores Williams

    Tennessee Williams might easily be remembered as the greatest American playwright of the 20th century. His characters are beautifully spoken poetic beings, the sort who utter great truths even as they fly into the flames of their own destruction. Wil...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Tender But Timid

    Athol Fugard's Valley Song, at Stages, addresses the struggles of a young black woman who lives in post-apartheid South Africa. Veronica (Melita Hawkins) is barely out of school and full of dreams. She yearns for a life outside her little town of Nie...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Class Over Kin - The melodrama Blood Brothers bonds with music

    British playwright Willy Russell's musical Blood Brothers is a brooding melodrama about magic, superstition and the dark divide of class. The play opens on an ominous scene. Gray light covers the stage. Starlight winks above. Foreboding and sorrowful...

    by Lee Williams on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Wilde Times

    Oscar Wilde was a larger-than-life writer, full of flamboyant, witty swagger. To critics who dared question the morality of his work, he famously declared, "There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. T...

    by Lee Williams on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Bay Area Ballet

    Ballet productions of Giselle seethe with secrecy, deception, vengeance and torture. A peasant girl goes mad when she discovers her lover is secretly engaged to another. Frenzied, she grabs his sword and kills herself. Desperate spirits of jilted bri...

    by Cynthia Greenwood on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    A Stitch in Time - Shows by Jane Miller and Cecilia Vicuna reveal a common thread

    To fully experience "Time Not Wasted," Jane Miller's installation at Rice University Art Gallery, you must carefully step around scattered floor "paintings" and audiotape "rugs," climb onto a 20-foot bed with a knotted muslin spread, walk around an o...

    by Susie Kalil on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Talk About Love and Hate - IBP's witty Marie and Bruce takes a hard look at language

    Lots of folks know Wallace Shawn's acting. He has played everyone from the sardonic whining Vayna in Vayna on 42nd Street to the balding, nerdy high school teacher in Clueless. But as funny as his closet of strange performances is, Shawn's writing i...

    by Lee Williams on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    Remaining Calm

    When the new year began, you couldn't go anywhere without hearing about Y2K. Even daily newspapers and the Red Cross were advising people to hoard water, food and cash. Y2K is closer now than it was then, but most of the daily reminders brought on by...

    by Shaila Dewan on April 8, 1999
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  152  |  ...  |  304  |  ...  |  456  |  ...  |  586  |  587  |  588  |  ...  |  608  |  ...  |  610  |  Next Page >> 11721 - 11740 of 12199
Houston Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

Loading...