Pop Rocks: Use "Super Bowl," Get Sued, What if Other Things Were Like This?

Clark and Seacrest are power hungry enough.
Clark and Seacrest are power hungry enough.

The NFL is a little weird. They really don't like people using the term Super Bowl, at least not if it is for profit...or even hints at such. This is why whenever you see ads for companies trying to promote something for the Super Bowl -- pizza delivery, perhaps -- unless they are licensed with the NFL (a terribly pricey proposition, I've heard), they say "big game" instead of "Super Bowl." In fact, the NFL can be so litigious about such things, they won't allow the use of team names or even, in certain cases, team colors. You can say Seattle or Denver, but you can't say Seahawks or Broncos. There are some who believe the city names shouldn't even be used together lest one might face the wrath of Roger Goodell and company.

Of course, for news outlets, it's all good. This is ostensibly because we aren't directly selling something. We're reporting. Just never mind those ads over there on the right when we say SUPER BOWL!

I got to wondering how that would impact the average person if other landmarks and events were colored by the same restrictions.

Statue Of Liberty

Upcoming Events

That big green lady with the torch doesn't exactly have a ring to it. I'd guess that even Lady Liberty would be vorbotten given the tie to the statue.

New Year's Eve

Don't laugh. I have no doubt that Ryan Seacrest and a consortium of media outlets would love to co-opt that name for permanent use. Alternative: Hangover Eve.   Christmas

While we're on holidays here, imagine if the "War on Christmas" extended itself into the realm of copyright infringement. Maybe the church would nab the name and prevent it from being used as to keep the Christ in Christmas and all that. Perhaps we could return it to what it was called before they co-opted it the first time: Winter Solstice.

Insert Celebrity Name Here

What if celebs started trademarking their names. You obviously can't use the name of a person for an ad unless they endorse said company or product, but what if everyday use were banned. I guess I wouldn't mind calling Patrick Stewart "Real Life Picard," but what the hell am I supposed to do about Kate Upton? Don't answer that.

The Houston Press

Oh, hey, don't laugh. You might be infringing right now, buster. From here on out, don't even put the words Houston and Press together. Just like Albert Brooks said of "nest egg" in Lost in America to Julie Hagerty, you have lost the privilege, unless of course you are buying an ad, in which case, carry on, good sir.


Sponsor Content

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >