IT

Photo courtesy of Brooke Palmer/Warner Bros.

Details

Tue., Sept. 26, 11:35 a.m., 12:35, 1:35, 2:50, 3:50, 4:50, 6:10, 7:15, 8:05, 9:20 & 10:25 p.m., Wed., Sept. 27, 11:35 a.m., 12:35, 1:35, 2:50, 3:50, 4:50, 6:10, 7:15, 8:05, 9:20 & 10:25 p.m. and Thu., Sept. 28, 11:35 a.m., 12:35, 1:35, 2:50, 3:50, 4:50, 6:10, 7:15, 8:05, 9:20 & 10:25 p.m. 2017
$5.14 to $6.93

Location Info:

Cinemark Hollywood Movies 20
2101 E. Beltway 8 at Pasadena Blvd.
Pasadena, TX  77503
713-475-8180
It floats in the darkness, unspooling onscreen with a sepulchral glow. It has waited for what seems like an eternity to meet the eyes of its audience, and it senses in them both anticipation and dread. Yes, there was that bizarre miniseries back in 1990 (God, remember Tim Curry in that?), but humans have been trying to turn Stephen King's IT into projected images ever since the novel came out in 1986 and “IT” – that indescribable, interdimensional being – first met the world. Many overmatched adapters have come and gone, all trying to find a way to contain this massive story and to convey some sense of the unspeakable (and perhaps unfilmable) evil contained within it. IT knows its own power. There’s a reason that it has endured all these years. Its portrait of childhood – one of bullies, of ritual humiliations, of neglectful parents, of puberty and self-loathing – is universal. And there’s something awesomely compelling about an eternal beast that lies waiting in the sewers, a creature as old as time that feeds on children, in part because of the tastiness of their boundless imagination and fear. In IT, coming of age in suburbia meets the unthinkable horror of the beyond: E.T. meets Cthulhu.

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >