I’m Addicted to Gay Porn. Help!

I’m Addicted to Gay Porn. Help!
Jeff Fitlow

Dear Willie D:

I am addicted to gay porn and women who strap on men. Don’t shame me, but it is getting out of hand. I want to quit, but it just seems like that’s all I like. It is a little unrealistic, but it is [a] pure pleasure that I do not get from actual intercourse with a man, but I feel so much shame watching porn and rubbing it out.

My question is, do I forget the shame and continue, or do I put the porn away and deal with real life?

Strap On:

It seems to me that you are living out some type of fantasy with watching gay porn. Most guys fantasize about watching girl-on-girl action, so it’s not surprising that a woman could get turned on by watching men on men, or a man getting strapped up. Each of us have our own personal fetishes, so no matter what I say, you won’t change because this is real life to you.

I don’t understand, and neither do I care to understand, how such a thing can turn a woman on. But as long as it’s not negatively affecting your life, I say, forget the shame and continue.

MY RELIGIOUS FRIEND IS A HYPOCRITE

Dear Willie D:

Having lived in the Bible Belt throughout Mississippi, Florida and Tennessee, I grew up with Southern values. I don’t believe any of us are perfect, but we should strive to treat each other perfectly.

My friend and I work in customer service at a grocery store. She is 27 and I’m 41. I’m like a big sister to her, but she is my manager. We get along mostly, but when she doesn’t agree with me, or if I say something she doesn’t like, she sometimes hits me on the arm or kicks me (not hard) like she did yesterday when I came from the restroom because the line got too long.

I don’t really mind the love taps; it’s the cursing, getting into fights with other employees, and being rude to customers that I question, because she goes to church every Sunday and claims to believe in God. The Bible says, “There is one who speaks rashly like the thrusts of a sword, but the tongue of the wise brings healing.”

By this standard, my friend would be considered a hypocrite, correct?

Southern Values:

Correct, your friend is a hypocrite according to scripture. Consider this: Everyone has bad days, but when you are uniformly rude, you don’t truly know God. Anyone who says different is a backslider trying to get a pass.

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STOP CALLING DONALD TRUMP A RACIST!

Dear Willie D:

Why do you and many of your supporters continue to call Donald Trump a racist? He got 25 percent of the Black vote, 20 percent of the Hispanic vote and 40 percent of the Asian vote. That means he is a unifier, not a divider, as you claim. Your guy lost. Respect the seat of the presidency, move on, and stop calling Trump a racist!

Moving On:

Lol. Where did you go to school to be pulling numbers out your ass like that? You sent this message to me through the Internet, which leads me to believe you have access to a search engine, such as Google, that would have easily given you true election result numbers.

Anyway, while Donald Trump has a well-documented history of racial discrimination lawsuits, and insensitive remarks against people of color, the votes he received from people of color say more about their ethnic tolerance than his. But if you want to believe Trump is the answer, knock yourself out. I’ll be standing in the corner with the smelling salt.

BTW: I do respect the seat of the presidency, I just don’t respect the person who’ll be sitting in it come January 20, 2017.

WHY AREN'T YOUNGER RAPPERS SPEAKING UP ABOUT INJUSTICE?

Dear Willie D:

It seems like in today's society, a lot of young rappers would never speak up against the injustices going on in America. When I came up, I enjoyed listening to the Geto Boys, P.E. and other artists who taught me different types of things. Now they just want to turn up. We have a few like Kendrick and J. Cole, but the majority of the artists, like Lil Wayne, are on that bullshit genocide music straight-up.

Straight Up:

Hmm. There are younger rappers speaking out against injustice. They’re just not being promoted and celebrated like the others. I think the biggest difference between now and then is, rappers of yesterday mostly described the rough environment they came from, whereas many rappers today glorify it. The talent standard was higher also because both the gatekeepers and the fans demanded it.

It seems as though with all the complaining that I hear and see on social media, the rappers with limited talent would be extinct by now, but they aren’t. They still dominate the charts and pack out arenas. Somebody lying.

Ask Willie D anything at willied.com/ask-willie-d, and come back next Thursday for more of his best answers.


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