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Lonesome Onry and Mean: The Mucky Duck Hits a Hot Streak In the Cool Weather

Lonesome, Onry and Mean just noticed that venerable listening room McGonigel's Mucky Duck has a major streak of high-grade talent Nov. 12 through 17. Beginning with the Subdudes on the 12th, the Duck quickly plows through Texas legend Ray Wylie Hubbard (13th), troubadour-poet Tom Russell (14th), one of Nashville's biggest talents, Darrell Scott (15th) and George Strait hit writer/two-time Grammy winner Jim Lauderdale (17th). Since reforming a couple of years ago, the Subdudes have been packing out the Duck whenever they pass through town. Like the Iguanas, the 'Dudes bring it the old-school New Orleans way.

Mr. "Screw You, We're From Texas" himself, Hubbard is one of those guys who still finds joy in his work after 40 years on the circuit, and he never disappoints with his wry wit and screw-you attitude.

 

Russell has become even more western and enigmatic since moving from Los Angeles to El Paso a few years ago. Whether he's waxing poetic about Mickey Mantle or Cassius Clay or Charles Bukowski, Russell always digs deep and seems to continually refine the fine art of folk singing troubadour. And praise doesn't come any higher in this line of work than being covered by Joe Ely or Dave Alvin.

 

Darrell Scott is one of the hottest properties in the Nashville that exists somewhere away from Music Row. Scott is a triple threat writer, singer and picker, and is one of the truly singular artists hanging around Music City. A guy who would rather be home cooking than touring, his trips to Houston are rare. His 2008 album of righteous covers, American Hymns , set a new gold standard of Americana.

 

Jim Lauderdale hit paydirt in 1993 when George Strait recorded two Lauderdale tunes on his album Easy Come, Easy Go and two more on 1994's Lead On . Strait has continued to go to the Lauderdale well throughout his career, even using Lauderdale's "Twang" as the title track for his most recent album earlier this year. But Lauderdale is far more than just a stellar country writer. He performs continually on both sides of the Atlantic, from festivals to honky-tonks to listening rooms.


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