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Aggies More Financially Successful Than Longhorns, Cougars, According to Study

Looks like the tea sippers need to work a little harder and/or become a bit more driven to best the Aggies.

PayScale recently published a study that breaks down earned income for college graduates. The 2010-11 survey, which is supported by 2010 United States Census data, is broken into two categories: starting median salary and mid-career (15 years) median salary.

According to the data, Texas A&M is the Lone Star State's best public school to attend if you're wanting to make bank. On average, fresh-faced Aggie diploma holders earn $50,900 while15-year grinders make $93,300.

Meanwhile, new grads and seasoned workers from University of Texas at Austin take home $49,100 and $87,500, respectively.

Scoreboard, Aggies.

Rice University, 45th nationally, locked down Texas's overall number-one position. New graduates from the private school make, on average, $53,600 per year while mid-career workers earn $100,000 annually. Of course, if you're a non-scholarship graduate of the stupid expensive institution, much of your salary is chucked back into student-loan debt.

The highest-paid brainiacs hail from the liberal arts/engineering Harvey Mudd College, a private institution in Claremont, California. Ripe Mudd alumni rake in an average of $68,000 per year while seasoned mid-career types bring home $126,000.

PayScale also released research statistics that display the highest versus lowest earning majors. Petroleum engineering took the top slot while special education occupied the last spot on the totem pole.

Here's the breakdown, in order from highest to lowest mid-career earning potential, for a handful of Texas's universities (go to PayScale.com for the complete list):

Aggies More Financially Successful Than Longhorns, Cougars, According to Study
Table design by Monica Fuentes

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