Where Would 2016 Brock Osweiler Rank Among All-Time Cleveland Browns QBs?

Based on the team he is now playing for, Brock Osweiler may actually, comparatively, be a viable starter.
Based on the team he is now playing for, Brock Osweiler may actually, comparatively, be a viable starter.

I fully realize that if we go back to Friday, this makes two straight posts about former Texans quarterback Brock Osweiler. The guy's not even in Houston anymore, so I know I should be able to let the whole Osweiler nightmare go, but I just can't.

My inability to free myself of the man comes partially out of anger for the way Osweiler put a concrete ceiling on the Texans' 2016 playoff chances (honestly, it's a miracle they even MADE the playoffs with him starting at QB for most of the season). And partially because now with every dopey Brock press conference that I watch, I thank all the football gods he is no longer here.

So, SOME of my grudge comes from a good place — thankfulness!

Anyway, the one sound bite that even the most staunch Brock Osweiler apologists (believe it or not, he has some, mostly with 303 or 720 area codes) couldn't defend from last week's OTA presser is this one...

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Brock Osweiler telling someone to put on the film from the past two years to prove he's a good quarterback is like O.J. Simpson telling someone to watch The People vs O.J. to see what a great guy he was. It lacks in self-awareness and makes zero sense. In other words, it's the most Osweilerian thing Brock has ever said...and that's saying something!

But let's for just one minute remember WHERE Brock is now plying his trade. Brock Osweiler is a Cleveland Brown, and we know that the standard to be a starting quarterback in Cleveland is somewhere just north of "has a pulse and speaks a few words of English."

Maybe, just maybe, Brock Osweiler was affirmatively answering the "Are you good enough to be a starting quarterback in this league?" question as he was mentally stacking up his film over the last two years to the film of Browns starters over the previous 18 years, from the time the Browns returned as a franchise in 1999.

Keep in mind, the Browns have made one playoff appearance and have had one double-digit-win season since 1999, so If that's the case, there's a chance that Osweiler's 2016 work actually stands up fairly well compared to that of Browns signal callers of the past 18 years. To that end, here are the full statistics from the leading Browns passers in each of their seasons since returning to the league in 1999:

Yr       PLAYER       GS(Rec)      Cmp   Att   Comp%   Yds     TD(%)    INT(%)    Y/A     Rate    
1999   Couch           14 (2-12)       223   399    55.9       2447   15 (3.8)  13 (3.3)     6.1     73.2
2000   Couch             7 (2-5)         137   215    63.7       1483     7 (3.3)    9 (4.2)     6.9     77.3
2001   Couch           16 (7-9)         272   454    59.9       3040   17 (3.7)  21 (4.6)     6.7     73.1
2002   Couch           14 (8-6)         273   443    61.6       2842   18 (4.1)  18 (4.1)     6.4     76.8
2003   Holcomb         8 (2-6)         193   302    63.9       1797   10 (3.3)  12 (4.0)     6.0     74.5      
2004   Garcia           10 (3-7)         144   252    57.1       1731   10 (4.0)    9 (3.6)     6.9     76.7
2005   Dilfer             11 (4-7)         199   333    59.8        2321   11 (3.3)  12 (3.6)    7.0     76.9
2006   Frye              13 (4-9)         252   393    64.1        2454   10 (2.5)  17 (4.3)    6.2     72.0
2007   Anderson      15 (10-5)       298   527    56.5        3787   29 (5.5)  19 (3.6)    6.7     82.5
2008   Anderson        9 (3-6)         142   283    50.2       1615      9 (3.2)    8 (2.8)    5.7     66.5
2009   Quinn              9 (2-7)         136   256    53.1       1339      8 (3.1)    7 (2.7)    5.2     67.2
2010   McCoy            8 (2-6)          135  222    60.8        1576     6 (2.7)    9 (4.1)    7.1     74.5
2011   McCoy           13 (4-9)         265  463    57.2        2733    14 (3.0)  11 (2.4)    5.9    74.6
2012   Weeden         15 (5-10)      297  517     57.4        3385    14 (2.7)  17 (3.3)   6.5    72.6
2013   Campbell         8 (1-7)        180  317     56.8        2015    11 (3.5)    8 (2.5)    6.4   76.9
2014   Hoyer             13 (7-6)       242  369     55.3        3326     12 (2.7)  13 (3.0)   7.6    76.5
2015   McCown          8 (1-7)        186  292     63.7        2109     12 (4.1)   4 (1.4)    7.2   93.3
2016   Kessler            8 (0-8)        128  195     65.6        1380       6 (3.1)   2 (1.0)    7.1   92.3  
AVG                          11 (4-7)        206  346     59.5        2299     12 (3.5)  11 (3.2)   6.6   77.7

2016 Osweiler           14 (8-6)       301  510    59.0         2957     15 (2.9)  16 (3.1)   5.8   72.2

A few observations:

1. About the only thing Brock Osweiler definitively did better than this slew of Browns quarterbacks was "have really good defensive teammates," hence, the 8-6 record as a starter, which would be tied for the second-greatest record for a starting QB in Browns history (tied with the immortal Tim Couch in 2002), and behind only Derek Anderson's unicorn of a 2007 season, in which he went 10-5 as the starter.

2. Aside from his record as a starter, Osweiler's 2016 stats blend in like a chameleon. His completion percentage is just a half a percentage point from the Browns passers' average and the interception percentage is damn near identical (3.2 to 3.1). The yards per start are also nearly identical (211 to 209). In other words, Brock should have looked at that reporter who asked him the question and said, "Well, yeah, I blend in perfectly around here!"

3. However, one little stat where Brock ranks WAY down the line in this crew, and this should depress the holy hell out of Texans fans — his 72.2 passer rating would have ranked ahead of only three Browns QB seasons (Charlie Frye's 72.0 in 2006, Brady Quinn's 67.2 in 2009, and Derek Anderson's 66.5 in 2008 — yes, Derek Anderson had the best AND worst seasons in modern Browns history in back-to-back years. Around here, we call that a "Schaub.")

So maybe, just maybe, Brock Osweiler was answering that question with a bit of historical perspective. I mean, this is the guy who introspectively said "every interception has a story." He would know.

Listen to Sean Pendergast on SportsRadio 610 from 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays. Also, follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/SeanTPendergast and like him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SeanTPendergast.


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