No Bacon or Shellfish?

Online readers respond to "Depart From Me! I Never Knew You, Eaters of Bacon," Eating...Our Words blog, by Katharine Shilcutt, February 23.

Oh, Katharine: Don't you know you can't combine all those shellfish with a BLT? The mayo-coated lettuce would make all those excreetment-infused mussels just slide right out of the middle. Gotta leave off the unhealthy green stuff. You heathen.

As for Oafsteen, well, who needs to know the Word in order to preach it? That just gets in the way of the important stuff: de monet.


Christian vegetarians: Thanks for the article about Joel, but I want to point out that you are mistaken in thinking no other Christians see relevance in the dietary codes of Leviticus or Deuteronomy. The Seventh-day Adventist Church, a worldwide denomination with 15,000,000 members, also teaches that they have continuing relevance for us. The Adventist Church, founded in 1863, has been a leader in health education and in connecting diet with spirituality. The primary concern for Adventists is healthy living — we have a prominent network of hospitals as well as a medical school, Loma Linda University. We encourage a vegetarian diet, because the Bible says that was man's original diet. We teach that if someone is going to eat meat, it is best to restrict the diet to those foods that God specifically gave permission to eat. As a result of this diet (and abstinence from tobacco and alcohol), Adventists are blessed with longer, healthier lives than the general population.

Bill Cork

Ah, yes: Mr. Kellogg. Didn't he also advocate abstinence (even within the confines of marriage) and a thorough regimen of routine enemas? He sounds fun.


Show some respect: Since when is being a Torah (Old Testament)-observant person "bizarrely old-fashioned"?! I'm not a huge fan of Osteen, but your condescending article goes to show you how far we have come away from G-d.

Think all you want of those who believe in G-d and follow his Word, but if you're going to write an article, try not to come off as ignorant. You mock the Word of G-d and think it's so funny. You may not agree, believe or even follow anything in the Bible, but show some respect.

Your closing comments are also both ignorant and offensive. Perhaps you should read the Bible and realize that certain laws were put forth after G-d saw how his people had strayed away.

I feel sorry for this author.

Sal B

Wow: Katharine didn't slam the laws at all, folks. She's just pointing out that it's rather interesting that a man who preaches at Mega-Church would actually preach something like this when all he ever preaches is a "feel-good" gospel.

Not to discredit Jews or Christian sects that actually follow these laws (lots of these still have great merit today), but it's fairly common knowledge that most Christians don't follow these old dietary laws, much less preach about them.

There's nothing anti-Semitic about this, because she's not talking about it in the context of the Jewish people, she's talking about it in the context of a Christian sect.

Main point is that all Osteen ever preaches is "feel-good" prosperity gospel, and this is not something that's being preached about for biblical context or study, but as a health benefit. Typical Osteen.


Great read, Katharine: I personally find blind adherence to antiquated dogmas amusing, and any religion which restricts something as holy as bacon and shellfish isn't worth the time of day.


Dear God: I have never prayed to you before. I have no tongue for it. No one, not even you, will remember if we were good men or bad. Why we fought, or why we died. All that matters is that two stood against many. That's what's important! Valor pleases you, grant me one request. Grant me bacon-wrapped shrimp! And if you do not allow me bacon-wrapped shrimp, then to hell with you!


His order: I'll have a shrimp cocktail and a BLT.

Jim Gossen

Ludicrous: Religion has so many shortcomings, I don't even know where to begin. Telling me that I can't eat something because "God" says so is ludicrous. Anyone who preaches such a thing impeaches his own credibility. Even if I were to grant that there is a god (which I do not), I do not recognize your exclusive ability to know what he or she thinks, let alone your right to tell me about it.

In short, pipe down, Jesus-freaks.


Rezzies for hell: Wow, what a fun bunch of comments. For what it is worth, 95 percent of my Christian friends (who tend to be theologically conservative, socially liberal community activists) eat pork and shellfish, and regard the absolutely insanely inhumane "factory farms" where most poultry is raised as offensive to God and common sense.

They also tend to smile and not disagree when I go on a rant about how that River Oaks-living pseudo-preacher should be up on North Shepherd wearing plaid pants and white shoes, while telling the Mexicans that no money down and $250 a week is a really good deal for a Pinto, Gremlin, Yugo or Vega. There is a large and hot corner of hell that is nothing but televangelists, Navy chaplains and pedophile priests, and boy does Joel have a reservation.

jim sherman

What a nut job: If he really wanted to go old school, he should do Daniel's diet of only fruits and vegetables. No meat at all, and of course no wine. Then he should feed himself to hungry lions and see what happens.

God forgive me for saying that.


On the side: Joel has become a pick-and-choose preacher. You can pull anything out of the Bible and make a case for or against whatever you want. Such as "You are a sinner because you committed adultery!" But you are also a sinner if you worry a lot. Go ahead — look it up, but you have to read more than one verse. And c'mon, Joel, read the New Testament.

Keep it coming, Katharine! And give me a side of ham, bacon and throw in a couple pounds of crawfish!


Simple advice: Where did Joel cross the line? No damnation here — just friendly advice. Would "low-carb" diet advice also be "offensive" coming from a minister?

Nowadays we need a "Tough Smart Lawyer" just to insure we can safely eat prepared foods or risk taking barely regulated "meds." Why would anyone not appreciate a warning about foodstuffs that even our "primitive" forefathers knew of — and wanted to protect us from?

Katharine Shilcutt is very fortunate to have ascended beyond the need — or patience — for friendly advice.


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