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Ten Things That Could Go Wrong With Brazil's World Cup

Brazil is pretty, but pretty doesn't make up for everything.
Brazil is pretty, but pretty doesn't make up for everything.
Photo by Stefan Krasowski from Flickr

Oh, Brazil. Beautiful Brazil. Poor-at-planning Brazil. The World Cup kicks off in less than three weeks, and there are tons of problems, with more potentially on the way.

We decided to take a look at 10 things that could go wrong, and are going wrong, with the 2014 World Cup.

Yes, Portuguese and Spanish are different languages, and yes, Brazilians speak Portuguese.
Yes, Portuguese and Spanish are different languages, and yes, Brazilians speak Portuguese.

10.) The theme song sucks. The official World Cup song features two American Latinos, Pitbull and Jennifer Lopez, and one Brazilian, Claudia Leite. In the song, Pitbull raps in Spanish, not Portuguese. Oy.

 

The Black Bloc is a anti-government organization.
The Black Bloc is a anti-government organization.
Photo by Ninja Midia from Flickr

9.) There could be massive protests. The Black Bloc, a rebel, anti-government organization, has been around since last summer. They've destroyed shops, and even tried to lynch high-ranking police officers. Not good.

 

Maracanã, the site of the 2014 World Cup final.
Maracanã, the site of the 2014 World Cup final.
Photo by Luciano Silva

8.) Brazil will be in a lot of debt. The World Cup games will be played in six new stadiums and six renovated ones. That's a lot of construction. According to ESPN, Brazil has gone $1 billion above the original budget.

 

Ten Things That Could Go Wrong With Brazil's World Cup
Photo by Jorge in Brazil

7.) The airports might not be ready. When people from all over the world come to watch soccer games in your country, you probably don't want to have these issues. But Brazil has just that. At one airport, sections of a terminal had to temporarily close after heavy rain caused flooding, according to Fox Sports. Brazil is now planning to finish some of the airports' renovations after the World Cup is over.

 

Everyone knows world class soccer is no fun if there isn't an app to go with it.
Everyone knows world class soccer is no fun if there isn't an app to go with it.
Photo by Nuno Quina

6.) FIFA's official World Cup app doesn't work. (Oops?) FIFA created a phone app to cultivate an online community of fans. The problem is the app doesn't work. According to Marketing Week, the app crashes and fails to load news. That can't be what FIFA was going for, right?

 

People might not be able to share #instagood soccer photos like these. How not #chill is that?
People might not be able to share #instagood soccer photos like these. How not #chill is that?
Photo by Vasco Paulouro

5.) Actually, cell phones might not work at all. Multiple media outlets are reporting that Brazil is admitting to not having installed the necessary equipment to boost data services in some of the stadiums that will be used. How will people Instagram their awesome times?

 

Forget favelas, Brazil's Homeless Workers' Movement is living in a field next to a stadium.
Forget favelas, Brazil's Homeless Workers' Movement is living in a field next to a stadium.
Photo by dany13

4.) The homeless are protesting. Brazil's Homeless Workers' Movement has drawn approximately 7,000 people, according to the Los Angeles Times. The organization is protesting the money spent on new stadiums by camping out in a field near Arena Corinthians in Sao Paulo.

 

After strike, Sao Paulo's bus system may be as bad as Houston's.
After strike, Sao Paulo's bus system may be as bad as Houston's.
Photo by beranekp

3.) Bus drivers could still be striking. Bus drivers in Sao Paulo went on strike Tuesday, March 20. The strike is apparently losing steam, according to an Associated Press report. With all those tourists, you would think at least some might rely on public transportation.

 

Itaquerao, also known as Arena Corinthians, has yet to be tested at full capacity.
Itaquerao, also known as Arena Corinthians, has yet to be tested at full capacity.
Photo by DDG Arquitetura

2.) There might be issues with the opening venue. According to The Guardian, construction of São Paulo's Itaquerao stadium, the site of the opening ceremonies, is just now being finished. (It was supposed to be done a year ago.) The 70,000-person stadium has yet to be tested at full capacity. It's not like people from all over the world will be there to watch games at these stadiums or anything. It's all good, Brazil.

 

1.) Players are suing FIFA. That can't be good. Brazil's players' union is suing FIFA over matches that will start at 1 p.m. local time, saying the heat will be unbearable. There are 24 games scheduled to start at that time. The players want two-minute water breaks during each half of those games.


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