The "Battle of LA," 70 Years Ago Today: 5 Irrefutable Arguments Why It Was Actually a UFO Attack

The truth is out there.
The truth is out there.

Seventy years ago today, the Battle of Los Angeles occurred, a vicious fight that resulted in three civilian deaths.

Haven't heard of it? We're not surprised.

The U.S. government said what happened was nighttime antiaircraft crews protecting Los Angeles got nervous -- it was just two months after Pearl Harbor -- and opened fire on a weather balloon.

The crews also set off flares, and all the confusion just built on itself. So we're told.

Others say the night featured an attempted UFO landing, in which the valiant gun crews fought aliens trying to land.

It's pretty obvious the latter is true.

Obviously the aliens not only attempted to land, they succeeded. Just look at what's happened in Hollywood since then. The logic becomes inescapable.

5. The quantity of UFO/alien movies has increased dramatically Between 1911 and 1941, UFOs and flying saucers were occasionally a subject for films. Since then -- especially since the 1950s, after a necessary period of time to learn the equipment and infiltrate studio management -- movies about UFOs exploded. Coincidence? who's being naive, Kay?

A documentary
A documentary

4. The quality of UFO/alien movies has increased dramatically In the 1930s, UFOs were laughably portrayed on screen, obvious frauds. While it understandably took a decade or two to import the necessary technology from the home planet to Earth, all of a sudden you got Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Independence Day and the Transformers series. The aliens' unstinting desire for complete accuracy in movies is inspiring

3. Very, very strange people like Tom Cruise and Arnold Schwarzenegger have reached the pinnacle of Hollywood success One fiercely believes in aliens and Xenu as if he knows it was true and the other became an influential box-office legend despite documentaries that proved a) he could barely speak English, and b) he was a cyborg sent from the future to kill a specific human. Luckily for the U.S. -- and the world -- the aliens overreached when they had him elected California governor as a first step towards getting his finger on the nuclear button (Yes, their plans included overturning the "natural born citizen" section of the Constitution.)

2. The attacks suddenly stopped If it was a case of "itchy trigger fingers," why weren't there countless more up and down the coast? Answer: Because the aliens had succeeded in landing and needed no more attempts. Sherlock Holmes's "dog that didn't bark" theorem FTW, bitchaz.

1. They never found the "weather balloon" that started it all The feds would have you believe the following: 1) A weather balloon was shot at by a lot of antiaircraft guns 2) It, or its pieces, fell to the Pacific Ocean.

If that's true, why couldn't they produce the balloon? Surely the balloon (or the pieces thereof) would have floated in the Pacific for some time, and the Pacific is known by oceanologists to be, as they say, "not very big."

So why couldn't the government find this alleged "balloon"?

Think, people. And vote Ron Paul!!!

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