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Celebrate National Maple Syrup Day (TODAY!) With the Real Stuff From New England

Pure Maine maple syrup is so much better than the fake stuff.
Pure Maine maple syrup is so much better than the fake stuff.
Photo by Joanna O'Leary

I give credit to my husband for introducing me to a number of foods I had unintentionally excluded from my diet, including, but not limited to, kimchi, sardines, and pear lambic. Now, I love all three.

The "new" food I most associate with my better half, however, is real maple syrup. Shortly after he graduated from high school, my in-laws moved to Maine, and since then my husband has been privy to a steady supply of hand-crafted, small-batch maple syrup made by his parents' neighbor "Sweet William."

Which is why when I brought out the Aunt Jemima the first time we consumed pancakes together at my apartment Wyatt nearly had a stroke. "Throw that stuff in the garbage," he said with an air of disdain I've never heard him use since then. "Where's the real stuff?" Long story short, I've never been without pure Maine maple syrup again.

Egg nog waffles are ideal companions for real maple syrup.
Egg nog waffles are ideal companions for real maple syrup.
Photo by Joanna O'Leary

And since today, December 17, is National Maple Syrup Day, I'm honoring the holiday and my husband by cooking up some egg nog waffles, using this recipe minus the booze.

Egg nog waffles are not only a lovely medium for maple syrup, but also provide a handy way to get rid of any leftover/extra egg nog you have around the house. (Because, seriously, can anyone drink more than two cups of that stuff a day?)

You'll note in the photograph that I haven't poured syrup directly on the waffles. When eating waffles, I sometimes prefer to construct a separate well of syrup into which I delicately dip choice pieces that I think could most benefit from maple-flavor enhancement.

And sometimes I douse my waffles with so much syrup such that they become sweet carbohydrate sponges.


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