^
Keep Houston Press Free
4
| Gaming |

The Last of Us Video Game Has a Real Phone Sex Number in It

Sometimes video games include real life phone numbers in their play, either as a joke or as a mistake. In the case of Naughty Dog's The Last of Us, it's the latter, and unfortunately the mistake has made for some rather hot water. Scattered throughout the ruined, zombie-infested world is the remains of normal society, such as advertising leaflets. Most of these are illegible, but at least one flyer has a readable set of 800 numbers for a pest control service.

And both of them are sex hotlines. Dial 1-800-555-2545 looking to see if the developers threw in some meta-humor about getting zombie-causing mold spores out of your house and instead a husky voice will tell you that she's "Spread, wet, and ready for you right now."

You might think this was deliberate. After all, this is Naughty Dog, the company that slipped an Easter Egg into their Genesis game Rings of Power where their logo would transform into the image of a bare-chested woman. Nope, this time it was an accident.

Flashback Top 10 Smuttiest Video Game Easter Eggs (NSFW)

According to the game's creative director Nick Druckmann, the artists thought that using 555 would automatically create a null number since that's what the movies do. They were unaware that when using the 800 preface only 800-555-0199 is reserved for fictional use. All other numbers are regularly assigned. Even without the 800 preface only 555-0100 through 555-0199 are strictly set aside for movies and the like to be safe false numbers.

Currently, Naughty Dog is working on a patch to fix the mistake.

It's no surprise that people would call any number that they legibly came across in the course of the game. Upon reaching the end of the first God of War game on PS2 you can destroy the statues in your throne room if you're willing to hit them 400 times. Upon doing so, you receive a phone number to call that featured Kratos praising you before murdering the game's writer David Jaffe for butting into the conversation.

I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Houston and help keep the future of Houston Press free.

Sometimes calling a phone number was even part of plot. In the NES release of Who Framed Roger Rabbit you were instructed to find a phone number so you could call Jessica Rabbit inside the Ink & Paint Club in order to get tips on how to proceed. It was a real phone number, 1-800-232-3324, and if you dialed it in real life you would get the message...

"It is shocking the way some neighborhoods are getting. You practically can't walk anywhere without running into stray dogs, cats, and other animals. It makes you wish you carried a piece of meat, a fish bone, or a piece of cheese around with you. The weasel that is guarding Judge Doom's warehouse is the one called Stupid. I've heard that the only thing that'll get him to leave is a quick game of softball. Know anyplace where you could get a baseball in a hurry?"

Ironically, if you call that number today it's also for a sex chat service.

Jef With One F is a recovering rock star taking it one day at a time. You can read about his adventures in The Bible Spelled Backwards or connect with him on Facebook.

Keep the Houston Press Free... Since we started the Houston Press, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Houston, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Houston with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Press community and help support independent local journalism in Houston.

 

Join the Press community and help support independent local journalism in Houston.