Houston Texans Never has a team been adopted so quickly and so ferociously as the expansion Houston Texans. The ever-disappointing Oilers and their Snidely Whiplash owner are a distant memory as Reliant Stadium rocks to its rivets for every home game. The Texans themselves do more than their share, rarely getting blown out at home and providing unforgettable thrills, like the franchise-opening win over the hated Cowboys that forever cemented the team in the city's heart. The stadium gets unbelievably loud on Sundays -- the Super Bowl was a sedate gathering compared to some Texans games -- and the knowledgeable and frothing fans make it the place to be at least eight times a year. What will happen when the Texans finally make the playoffs is anyone's guess, but we're betting engineers will have to stay alert to see the place doesn't shake off its foundation.

Houston Texans Never has a team been adopted so quickly and so ferociously as the expansion Houston Texans. The ever-disappointing Oilers and their Snidely Whiplash owner are a distant memory as Reliant Stadium rocks to its rivets for every home game. The Texans themselves do more than their share, rarely getting blown out at home and providing unforgettable thrills, like the franchise-opening win over the hated Cowboys that forever cemented the team in the city's heart. The stadium gets unbelievably loud on Sundays -- the Super Bowl was a sedate gathering compared to some Texans games -- and the knowledgeable and frothing fans make it the place to be at least eight times a year. What will happen when the Texans finally make the playoffs is anyone's guess, but we're betting engineers will have to stay alert to see the place doesn't shake off its foundation.

Memorial Park Texan Lance Armstrong won his sixth straight Tour de France this summer. It's an incredible story. So incredible, in fact, that each time he wins, America runs out to buy more bicycles. But in a city as densely populated with cars and unfriendly bike roads as ours, where are our future cycling champions to go? You guessed it: to the trails of Memorial Park. There's simply no better place to ride inside the Loop. It's scenic and shaded, and even new riders can maneuver the track maneuvered easily. Plus, there are joggers, speed walkers, Frisbee throwers and other health-minded cuties to check out. If you're looking for a little inspiration, a quick glance at the hot, hard bodies circling Memorial Park is all you'll need.

Memorial Park Texan Lance Armstrong won his sixth straight Tour de France this summer. It's an incredible story. So incredible, in fact, that each time he wins, America runs out to buy more bicycles. But in a city as densely populated with cars and unfriendly bike roads as ours, where are our future cycling champions to go? You guessed it: to the trails of Memorial Park. There's simply no better place to ride inside the Loop. It's scenic and shaded, and even new riders can maneuver the track maneuvered easily. Plus, there are joggers, speed walkers, Frisbee throwers and other health-minded cuties to check out. If you're looking for a little inspiration, a quick glance at the hot, hard bodies circling Memorial Park is all you'll need.

Mark Cullen Aeros center Mark Cullen has had his share of tough breaks: a broken neck while at Colorado College, a broken ankle in the 2003 playoff run and a badly separated shoulder that caused him to miss two months this past season. More serious was the diagnosis in September 2003 of skin cancer, which eventually spread to his lymph nodes. Through it all, Cullen has kept on -- a solid assist man on one of the team's top lines, and at 25 years old, one who still has a good shot making it to the NHL. And while he's currently cancer-free, his brush with the disease awakened a new aspect to the easygoing personality he's always had. Now he's the team's most enthusiastic visitor to kids in area hospitals, he's leading a Memorial Hermann campaign to raise awareness of skin-cancer dangers, and he was named the American Hockey League's Man of the Year in 2004. Aeros fans are waiting eagerly to see what he can do in a full season.

Mark Cullen Aeros center Mark Cullen has had his share of tough breaks: a broken neck while at Colorado College, a broken ankle in the 2003 playoff run and a badly separated shoulder that caused him to miss two months this past season. More serious was the diagnosis in September 2003 of skin cancer, which eventually spread to his lymph nodes. Through it all, Cullen has kept on -- a solid assist man on one of the team's top lines, and at 25 years old, one who still has a good shot making it to the NHL. And while he's currently cancer-free, his brush with the disease awakened a new aspect to the easygoing personality he's always had. Now he's the team's most enthusiastic visitor to kids in area hospitals, he's leading a Memorial Hermann campaign to raise awareness of skin-cancer dangers, and he was named the American Hockey League's Man of the Year in 2004. Aeros fans are waiting eagerly to see what he can do in a full season.

Yao Ming During the NBA Finals this year, the Los Angeles Lakers thrilled the world by going down in selfish, egotistical flames. They devoted more energy to pointing fingers at each other than to putting the ball in the basket, and one of the most egregious offenders was Shaquille O'Neal, a whining, overweight superstar who thinks he's better than the game itself. Here in Houston, we have the Anti-Shaq. Seven-foot-five center Yao Ming is eager to pass the ball, says all the right things (through an interpreter, of course; for all we know he might actually be saying, "Gimme the damn ball!") and wants nothing more than to win. Being the Anti-Shaq has its drawbacks, of course -- Yao could gain a little more upper-body strength and we wouldn't complain. But in a city that knows how to treat large foreigners playing center for the Rockets, Yao has become a defining symbol for our favorite basketball team. Even if that means they need to be a little more aggressive once in a while.

Yao Ming During the NBA Finals this year, the Los Angeles Lakers thrilled the world by going down in selfish, egotistical flames. They devoted more energy to pointing fingers at each other than to putting the ball in the basket, and one of the most egregious offenders was Shaquille O'Neal, a whining, overweight superstar who thinks he's better than the game itself. Here in Houston, we have the Anti-Shaq. Seven-foot-five center Yao Ming is eager to pass the ball, says all the right things (through an interpreter, of course; for all we know he might actually be saying, "Gimme the damn ball!") and wants nothing more than to win. Being the Anti-Shaq has its drawbacks, of course -- Yao could gain a little more upper-body strength and we wouldn't complain. But in a city that knows how to treat large foreigners playing center for the Rockets, Yao has become a defining symbol for our favorite basketball team. Even if that means they need to be a little more aggressive once in a while.

Rice University The obvious choice would be Memorial Park, but there's something alternately peaceful and invigorating about doing a lap around Rice University. For starters, you've got that lovely canopy of trees providing shade along the dirt path. And peeking out through the foliage, you'll occasionally catch sight of downtown or the baby skyline at the Med Center, with its rad twin-syringe buildings. The area is especially pretty gleaming in the violet-orange sunset. With convenient parking, a smattering of collegiate lookers (some sweating off the Freshman 15), and about three miles of virtually stoplight-free thoroughfare, Rice is the place to shake off a day in the rat race.

Rice University The obvious choice would be Memorial Park, but there's something alternately peaceful and invigorating about doing a lap around Rice University. For starters, you've got that lovely canopy of trees providing shade along the dirt path. And peeking out through the foliage, you'll occasionally catch sight of downtown or the baby skyline at the Med Center, with its rad twin-syringe buildings. The area is especially pretty gleaming in the violet-orange sunset. With convenient parking, a smattering of collegiate lookers (some sweating off the Freshman 15), and about three miles of virtually stoplight-free thoroughfare, Rice is the place to shake off a day in the rat race.

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