When Hurricane Ike was destroying lives and property in Galveston, one man thought to himself, A-ha! I can use this! And that man was Jacob Calle, although he is probably better known as Hurricane Bear. That's because he donned a bear costume with a pink bowtie and moonwalked along a Galveston beach while TV news crews were surveying the damage. It got him on CNN and in The Wall Street Journal. He sold T-shirts from his Web site and made himself available for parties — but he also included a link to the Red Cross's Web site, so people could donate. It's an interesting idea, and we're eagerly awaiting the appearance of Hurricane Platypus.

Pho One

The name of the restaurant is a wordplay on owner Kim Oanh Vu's middle name. Vu comes from a famous pho family. Her father, Y Van Vu, opened one of the most famous noodle shops in Saigon in the 1960s — it was called Pho Tau Bay. In 1975, the year that Saigon fell, Y Van Vu and his six kids moved to the U.S. The family opened a noodle shop in Gretna outside of New Orleans which they proudly named Pho Tau Bay. The business took off and the Vu family opened more Pho Tau Bays, and then Katrina hit. All of the restaurants were closed, and the family evacuated. Kim Oanh Vu and her husband decided to stay in Houston and open a noodle shop here, but the name Pho Tau Bay was already taken in Houston. Pho One hasn't achieved the kind of fame that Pho Tau Bay had in Saigon or New Orleans. But the pho is made according to grandfather Vu's exacting recipe, and the beef broth is especially good. Try the beef soup (pho), the vermicelli salads and the flat noodles.

Few characters are as complicated as those built by the mighty brain of Tom Stoppard. Happily, actors as fine as Todd Waite make sure that all that complexity gets translated to the stage. The guiding force of the Alley Theatre's supercharged production of Rock 'n' Roll this past spring, Waite played Jan, a Czech lover of music. As Jan, he created a character who was both intellectually powerful and emotionally tender, a man who wanted to avoid politics even as he stood up for what he believed was right. Best of all, he made us fall in love with Stoppard all over again.

The kvetching character at the center of Clifford Odets's Awake and Sing! is no walk in the park for any actress — she's mean, destructive, even cruel. But Luisa Amaral-Smith managed to find the soul of Bessie Berger, the iron-fisted matriarch of the Jewish family Odets created. Bessie is the most terrible of mothers, crushing her family members even as she sets about trying to make them successful. She is, in short, the sort of mother who keeps therapists in business. But Amaral-Smith lifted Bessie out of the ick of caricature to create a fully realized woman — both deeply troubled and amazingly real, she was the embodiment of what acting is all about.

We like to think of Megaplexx North as the "Walmart" of pornography. A destination for perverts and couples the city over, this particular location in the Megaplexx chain takes its name to heart. Toys and strange apparatuses ensconce one section of the store, with a menacing swing as the centerpiece. One feature we really dig is the vintage magazine collection. They really don't make women the way they used to, and the DVD section is the stuff of legend, with everything from classic Jenna Jameson masterpieces all the way to new stuff from...you know what? We don't wanna incriminate ourselves. Check it out for yourself. Tell them "Eduardo" from the Houston Press says "Hi!"

Any respectable hockey team needs an enforcer — especially in the minor leagues, where fisticuffs are much of the draw. Luckily for the Aeros (and speedy scorers such as Corey Locke and Krys Kolanos), they've got one of the best in six-foot-six ice-boxer Matt Kassian. Like many a good enforcer, Kassian isn't much of a skater, but his fists have gained him YouTube notoriety while clearing the way for Locke and Kolanos to attack the nets without worrying too much for their safety. Kassian racked up an impressive fight card of 20 this season, according to www.hockeyfights.com, no small feat considering he appeared in just 56 games. (Props are also due to mean-as-hell defenseman Mitch Love, who, while lacking Kassian's intimidating physique, managed to lead the AHL with 34 brawls.) Further cementing his reputation as a goon among goons, Kassian took home the "Sickest Beard Award" in the Aeros' post-season facial hair contest.

Westheimer Antique Flea Market

Located in the heart of Montrose, this place is a twisting, turning, never-ending trove of antiques and furniture to fit any budget. With the relaxing sounds of Jimmy Buffet and Bob Marley in the background, cruise the aisles past a vast array of sofa tables, mahogany vintage mirrors, English cocktail bars and Victorian music cabinets. They've got all the usual suspects. But if you're looking for something a bit different, there's always the oversize tin pink flamingos, Scottish whiskey jugs — perfect for whistling into — and mid-century General Electric TVs for sale. The staff is ready to help you sort through the hodgepodge, and will even offer the occasional 50 percent-off sale, perfect for barely-legal folks looking to deck the apartment out with a bit of old-timey style.

Jen Payne was with another realty company when we went to her (twice, two years in a row, on opposite sides of the city), but both times she managed to find apartments within our price range that met our expectations and suited our changing needs. We had virtually no problems at either place, and the problems that did pop up were handled efficiently and with consideration. It's a gift to know how to point people toward what they want and avoid the duds, and Payne has it.

 

Gallery Sonja Roesch

No one is more dedicated to the maxim "less is more" than Gallery Sonja Roesch. Focused on reductive and concept-based art, the gallery breaks with the pop culture norm and instead shows work by artists who rebel against visual overload. Case in point is German painter Mario Reis, a frequent guest at the gallery. Reis is well known for his "river paintings" (canvases he submerges in river beds around the world, allowing the minerals in the water to stain an image on the surface). Reis makes almost no attempt to control his images, and once they're done, he resists embellishments and manipulation. Keeping his actions as an artist to a minimum, Reis nonetheless produces evocative works. In a scene filled with noisy, complicated art, Gallery Sonja Roesch is a respite showing uncluttered works that resonate with viewers.

DiverseWorks

Ben Tecumseh DeSoto and Ann Walton Sieber's photography exhibit "Understanding Poverty" at DiverseWorks was harrowing for its unflinching look at Houston's homeless. The show chronicled, from the late '80s to today, the story of Judy Pruitt, a.k.a. "Snow," an abandoned street kid begging, tricking and stealing to survive, as well as that of Ben White, a homeless man DeSoto and Sieber followed. The photos delved into the traumatized psychology of poverty and revealed hard truths about the broken-down system that perpetuates it. "DeSoto, who was a staff photographer at the Houston Chronicle for 25 years, has employed a photojournalist technique, and his imagery is augmented by Sieber's large chunks of text and quotes from literature. There were disturbing images of crack and heroin use, domestic abuse and life on the street. One section of photos addressed city programs and initiatives to document and help those in need. While DeSoto and Sieber's subject matter was hard to crack at first, once one connected with it, it became absorbing and rewarding. It was an ugly world, but one worth getting lost in.

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