If fish is on the menu for Saturday night, you need to head to Louisiana Foods Total Catch Market, located near Loop 610 and the Katy Freeway. The tiny market peddles the Gulf's finest by-catch: creatures that are accidentally caught while fishermen are netting a different species. But at Total Catch, fish expert P.J. Stoops reinvents the so-called "trash fish," giving them the attention and filleting they deserve. Best of all, you'll know you're getting fish no one else is selling. He'll even teach you how to cook up the finned beauties. (They don't call him Professor Fish Heads for nothing.) Total Catch opens up at 9 a.m. every Saturday. Just be sure you get there before all the fish swim away by early afternoon. 
Traders Village
When they say "village," they mean it: Here you will find more than 100 acres of all kinds of goodies — clothes, electronics, furniture, luggage, records, knives, jewelry, bikes, candles, cell phones...pretty much anything you can think of. Every weekend, 1,500 dealers open up shop to give you some of the best deals in town. And because you'll no doubt need to keep up your energy, you can replenish with food stands offering burgers, hot dogs, turkey legs, beer, funnel cakes, sausage-on-a-stick, roasted corn and other deliciousness. Take the whole family and make a day of it — there's no doubt everyone will leave with a smile.
Erotic Cabaret
If you want to feel luscious, head on over to Erotic Cabaret, a perennial favorite among Houston sex-havers. This sexy standby has been open since 1982, so the friendly and nonjudgmental staff knows its craft well — from the lube to the dirty dancewear. Erotic Cabaret sells the best costumes in town, sure to spice up any holiday. Bustiers, corsets and stripper shoes line the front of the store, and the prices can't be beat. If you need something a little more hands-on, head to the back for sex toys. And luckily, the Cabaret's right next to Radio Shack, should you run out of batteries.
Vinyl Junkie
Another much-needed record shop was added to the healthy yet modest music-store scene when this East End indie swung open its doors on November 1. Owned by South Dakota transplants Titus Haag and his wife, Vinyl Junkie focuses on punk and hardcore rarities (though one can also pick up a reissued Elliott Smith LP from time to time), which means that crate sifters are likely to find efforts by White Flight, Flaming Tsunamis, Brain Killer and Acephalix. When you tire of rummaging through the titles, feel free to post up to one of the space's couches, where Haag's adorable pit-bull puppy will be at the ready for some quality spooning time. The shop also hosts punk and metal shows that end at a reasonable hour.
Super H Mart
Clean, brightly lit and full of bargains, Super H Mart is still the standard by which we measure all Asian grocery stores. Food court with a wealth of ethnic specialties on the go? Check. Bakery with glamorous cakes and fascinating pastries? Check. Produce section stocking hard-to-find fruits and veggies? Check. Seafood department that will sell you a live fish and slice it any way you want it? Check. Kimchee department the size of a convenience store? Check. Toilets and industrial rice cookers sold next to Kellogg's cereal and sake? Check and check. Super H Mart has it all.
Pawn shops and gun stores are fine places to pick up a handgun or rifle if you like paying higher prices than usual to pay someone's rent or overhead costs, but the real gun enthusiasts in town all know that their best bet is hitting up the traveling High Caliber Gun & Knife Show, at its three Houston-area stops. Most every weekend in either Conroe, Pasadena or at the George R. Brown Convention Center, dealers from around the region show up to sell new and used handguns, rifles, survival gear and other related paraphernalia. Need a clip for your AR-15? Just ask around. Looking for a copy of the last Ted Nugent cookbook? Just head to one of the booths selling literature and other pamphlets. It's probably right next to the new Sarah Palin pop-up book.
Dr. Gleem Car Wash
Getting a car wash can be terminally boring: There's only so much time you can spend looking at rows of Christmas tree air fresheners and risqué mudflaps while you wait for the workers to scrub months' worth of grime and pigeon droppings from your neglected car's hood. That's why we like Dr. Gleem, which can turn even the biggest procrastinators into Type As. To wit: This venerable establishment offers not only car washes but oil changes — and has a barbershop and diner. That's right: You can grab a burger and get a haircut while your sweet ride is washed and lubed. We can't think of a more productive way, other than napping in the janitor's closet, to spend a lunch hour. Thank you, Dr. Gleem.
Black Dog Records
Well organized, easy to browse and stocked with foundational albums in the rock, soul and jazz genres, Black Dog Records is the spot to visit whether you are just starting a record collection, want some classic jams or are in need of replacing weathered first-edition pressings. For the wayfaring "music sounds so much better on vinyl" hipsters who happen to wander into the shop, Black Dog conveniently displays and sells LPs by indie rock faves Fleet Foxes and My Morning Jacket. The staff also boasts a vintage attitude — no noses in the air or poopy lips — that's refreshing in this age of music snobbery.
Big Kat's Tattoo and Barbershop
Bart Maloney has good hands. If he's not snipping away at the brand-new Big Kat's Barber Shop — he specializes in shear cuts and razor shaves — Maloney may very well be across the street at the Continental Club or Big Top, caressing his steel guitar in Nick Gaitan & the Umbrella Man, the Octanes, or all-caps '40s swing revivalists BANGBANGBOOM. As trusty with the clippers as he is with the strings, Maloney is also a good-humored, funny fellow who never lacks for an amusing anecdote about the goings-on around "The Island" at 3700 Main. Follow him on Twitter and you'll understand: "I wanna make a hood version of Hungry Hungry Hippos and call it Hungry Hungry Hookers."
Sinfull Bakery doesn't have its own store, but you can pick up its vegan delectables at Central Market, Whole Foods, Onion Creek Café and others — check the Web site for the full list. According to the bakery's Web site, the whole thing didn't "just start as a hobby" for owner and baker Brittany Dylan-Carnes. A vegetarian who's allergic to dairy products, Dylan-Carnes had to come up with special ways to satisfy her "ever-growing sweet tooth." And it paid off: She's come up with tasty vegan recipes for cupcakes, cookies, muffins, pies, kolaches, scones, sweet breads and other goodies. She can even make some items gluten-free or agave-sweetened, if such things float your boat. What's that, you say? You're skeptical that anything vegan can be tasty? Well go ahead and give Sinfull Bakery a shot. We're pretty sure you'll turn into a believer.

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