Super H Mart

The west side of Houston approximates Pacific geography. If you are looking for Southern Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipino or Indonesian groceries, head for Bellaire Boulevard. If on the other hand you're in search of stuff from the colder reaches of the Pacific, head to Super H Mart, Houston's top purveyor of all things Korean and Japanese. The food court astounds with its bounty of hotpots, sushi, bibimbap, kimchi, Korean barbecue and amazing Seoul-style marinated fried chicken. There's also an outlet of the Frenchified Korean answer to Starbucks — Tous Les Jours — wherein one might find splendid coffee and flaky pastries from Paris via Pusan to Houston. The seafood counter alone merits a trip, and wow, those beans, that astounding variety of rice and all those oodles of noodles.

Collectors Firearms

For Houston fanatics, Collectors Firearms is to gun geeks as Cactus Music in Montrose is to record geeks, or something like that. New guns, old guns and collectible guns are all here and accounted for, and the store's staff is always on hand to help school you on each piece. Not all the weapons at Collectors are your usual sporting goods fare either; there are some beautiful items here that are almost too pretty to do anything with but mount on a wall and stare at.

Whether you are buying birthday party favors for the kids, stocking up on cleaning supplies for the house or just penny-pinching, you can't do much better than Giant $ and their ten Houston stores. Their clean locations and daily deals make this a valuable resource for families looking to make ends meet, plus they always have some quirky foodstuffs on their shelves, like our favorite instant Vietnamese coffee.

Honey Farm Bed and Breakfast

Wake up to the smell of a country breakfast at the Honey Farm Bed and Breakfast. Located far enough away from downtown Houston to have a country feel but close enough to allow for quick trips in to major attractions and entertainment districts, Honey Farm is a working family farm with penned miniature horses, goats, llamas, chickens, ducks and rabbits. (You can pet and hand-feed them if you want, or take one of the tame llamas out for a stroll.) The house is surrounded by horse pastures and flower beds, with beehives located just a short walk from the front door. There are four rooms available for B&B guests: the Sunset Suite with king-size bed and a private sitting area, the Honey Room with a queen-size bed and private patio, and two simpler rooms. The owners harvest fresh honey from the farm's buzzing beehives; if you're lucky you'll get some with breakfast. And as a bonus, all those bees keep the flowers on Honey Farm well-pollinated, so there's always something blooming.

Kid to Kid Clothing

Who wants to buy brand-new clothes for their kid? It's wasteful, needlessly expensive and the little whippersnappers will outgrow them before you know it. Of course, you don't want to have your offspring looking like latter-day Dickensian ragamuffins, either, which is where Kid to Kid Clothing comes in. There, you can trade in your kids' own clothing for either cash (paid on the spot) or 20 percent more value in store credit, and their gently used inventory of school, play and fancier attire is second-to-none in the Bayou City. Name brands like Ralph Lauren, Gap, Gymboree and even Hanna Ander­sson and Lilly Pulitzer abound on their racks and shelves, all available at a bare sliver of mall prices.

Kegg's Candies

Walk into the Kegg's Candies Meyerland-area store and you might think you see chocolate cupcakes among the offerings. Look a little closer — the yummy cupcake-looking treats are actually oversize peanut butter cups that have a big taste to match their size. Kegg's dates back to 1946, when Robert Kegg started experimenting in his mom's kitchen. That quickly led to a shop in the Rice Village. The shop has since changed hands, but current owner Carl A. Bartuch Jr. has maintained the Kegg tradition of using only the finest fresh ingredients to create delightful confections. Along with dozens of types of delicious concoctions, there are plenty of novelty items (light and dark chocolate shaped like poker chips, sports equipment, letters and the like). You don't have to have a pocket full of money to enjoy Kegg's goodies — milk chocolate rounds, pressed into turtle, sand-dollar, flower and butterfly shapes, among others, are all less than $1. For a behind-the-scenes look at Kegg's candy kitchen, visit the factory location (8168 Westpark) for a self-guided tour. See candy made from start to finish, and stop by Kegg's in-factory store and ice cream parlor, where you'll find frozen custard and Italian ice in addition to chocolate candy.

Our dogs are not like our children — they are our children. And you only want the best for your kids, even if they periodically pee on the floor, hump random objects and beg for food. Demi's Dog House on West Gray is the local choice for grooming, with flexible hours and decent prices that won't make you reach for the clippers yourself. They don't just groom and beautify, they even have doggy daycare, complete with nap and snack time. Now if they could just teach our pups to talk, we would be in business.

Blue Willow Bookstore

It's more than just the selection of books that makes Blue Willow Bookshop the best children's bookstore — it's the knowledgeable staff that cinches the deal. Whether you have a seven-year-old girl fascinated by frogs or a 12-year-old boy who's reluctant to read about anything but space invaders, the Blue Willow staff knows just what to put in their hands to spark their interest. Young readers can come dressed as their favorite characters to the many Blue Willow kids' events, including author appearances, readings, story hours and parties. And the shop's browse-before-you-buy policy makes for stress-free shopping.

Thompson's Antique Center of Texas

Usually, when an antique mall moves, it heralds bad news. But that's not the case with Thompson's Antique Center of Texas. The new place, in the former JC Penney's in Northwest Mall, is movin' on up, as the Jeffersons would say. The old venue was musty; now, it's cheerful, with better air-conditioning and lighting. They've attracted more dealers to fill the site's more than 100,000 square feet — good dealers, at that — while keeping the same friendly staff and volunteers. One recent swoop proved to be one-stop shopping for a dinner party à la 1950: We picked up nearly a complete set of darling Wedgwood china, festooned with delphiniums; some lovely, hand-embroidered pillowcases; a set of knives and forks with Bakelite handles; and a canasta tray with two decks of unused cards. Dinner is served, thankfully sans the requisite tomato aspic of yore.

Adolf Hoepfl & Son

North Shepherd is an ugly, functional thoroughfare: Houston's undisputed Muffler Row, lined with one used car dealership, spare-parts peddler, tire barn and transmission barn after another. The immaculately white, bunting-adorned, vintage-neon-announced Hoepfl garage appears almost as a mirage amid this sea of asphalt, exhaust miasma and general automotive grunge. Once inside, you'll find that the TLC doesn't stop at creating a pretty exterior. Owners Sybren and Kathryn van der Pol bought the now 66-year-old shop from the Hoepfl family in 2004, and they run a fair, thorough and honest business, pinned on the belief that if you take care of the customers and give back to the community, then the business will take care of itself. Hoepfl and Sons transcends mere repairs and maintenance: The shop is also the site of vintage car shows, educational seminars (often teaching teens about routine repairs and maintenance), fish fries and ice cream socials. Rice grad Kathryn Van der Pol also makes a mean glass of lemonade and, as an avid cyclist, will adjust the specs on your bike helmet strap free of charge.

Best Of Houston®

Best Of