NRG Stadium

If you're looking to tie the Houston Texans' 2014 improvement, from 2-14 in 2013 to 9-7 last season, to one statistic, look no further than the defense's ability to force turnovers. In 2013, the Texans' defense set a record for the fewest turnovers forced in a season (11); in 2014, they led the NFL in turnovers forced (34). That doesn't happen by accident, not in a Romeo Crennel-coached defense. Certainly, having the best player in football helps, but Crennel's experience (three Super Bowl rings as a defensive coordinator in New England) along with his ability to teach players, young and old, is a huge difference maker for a staff with a second year head coach. "Romeo is a great teacher of the game," said Ted Johnson, who played for Crennel from 2001 through 2004 in New England. "He had us better prepared than any coach I've ever been around." With no franchise quarterback on the roster, if the Texans are to continue their ascent in 2015, it will be on the back of the defense. With Crennel at the controls, they're well equipped on that side of the ball.

READERS' CHOICE: Bill O'Brien

NRG Stadium

From winning the 2012 Bear Bryant Award in his first year at Penn State to overseeing the Texans' seven-game turnaround in his first season in Houston, Bill O'Brien's ability to lead by instilling belief is unquestioned. But it's his leadership at home, along with his wife Colleen, that makes him a rare breed of role model. The O'Briens' older son, Jack, 13, has a rare genetic neurological disorder called lissencephaly. (The O'Briens also have a ten-year-old son, Michael.) Jack can't walk or talk or feed himself. He can't do things typical teenage kids can do. O'Brien manages to deftly juggle the duties of the most pressure-packed sports job in town with the massive responsibilities that come with being a parent of a special-needs child. In a 2012 Sporting News profile on O'Brien, Colleen said all you need to know: "Bill's a great dad, that's what's most important."

Most amusement centers these days look like what they are: relics from another time. They may fight the good fight to keep the lights on, but the chipped paint and faded signs show that they're not fighting that hard. For those times you're feeling nostalgic for the glory days of friendly competition with your friends, really want to show off your skeeball skills on a first date or want a badass go-kart ride, you'll be glad that Speedy's Fast Track is still alive and kicking. Have you forgotten what it's like to have fun without a cellphone in your hand? Get back in touch with the thrills of your youth and keep both hands on the go-kart wheel. Digital is cool, but so is the wind in your face.

Wildcat Golf Club

When times are tight, Houstonians still love to golf, but we don't want to sacrifice quality for the price. That's why Wildcat Golf Club, since opening in 2001, has been the benchmark for daily-fee public golf courses in this city. It's a private-course experience at a public-course price, with rolling hills that give players a fantastic view of Houston's city skyline and sports stadiums from nearly anywhere. In addition to keeping their course affordable to the public (all-inclusive memberships are available for a few hundred bucks), owners Tim Loiodice and Elmer Stephens have made Wildcat the go-to for companies and charities to host corporate events and fundraisers. It's also an underrated spot to run into local sports celebrities, as it's the official golf course for all the Houston pro teams.

READERS' CHOICE: Memorial Park

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