History

The Sacred Music of Houston Record Mogul Don Robey

Houston's Don Deadric Robey -- half black, half Jewish, all gangster -- beat Berry Gordy by ten years to become the first African-American record mogul. A gambler and a hustler, he did not get there by playing fair, but Robey put out some of the greatest gospel, R&B and rock and roll records of the 1950s and '60s from a building in the Fifth Ward. As Stax would later define Memphis grit, Duke/Peacock was raw, black Southern music for an audience more into jubilation than assimilation.

The 2809 Erastus Street address housed Robey's sophisticated Bronze Peacock Dinner Club from 1945 to '53, and in a back office he launched Peacock Records in 1949 after his discovery Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown didn't get much promotion on two singles for L.A.'s Aladdin label. Peacock first made its name in the gospel field, then hit it big in R&B in 1953 with Big Mama Thornton's "Hound Dog," predating the sensational Elvis Presley cover by three years.

After he acquired the Duke label in the early '50s, Robey's stable of acts contained not only Gatemouth, but Bobby "Blue" Bland, Junior Parker, Johnny Ace, Roscoe Gordon, Memphis Slim, Johnny Otis, Big Walter and the Thunderbirds and O.V. Wright.