Concerts

Coachella: Best of Weekend 2, Day 2

More fun in the desert from our friends at LA Weekly and OC Weekly -- ed.

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Meranda Carter
Saturday at Coachella meant tributes, tributes, tributes. From Levon Helms to Biggie, everyone got a shout-out. In between all that, some nasty partying and a little recreational drug use. Read our highly-trained writers as they tell you the best things they saw on Saturday, April 21, at Coachella.

The Black Lips' Biggie Smalls "Hologram": The Black Lips set the bar pretty high with their nudie show last week. So, to up the ante, they brought out a cardboard cutout of Biggie Smalls; the point was that B.I.G. not feel left out after the debut of Tupac's hologram last week. Then Ian St. Pé shotgunned a beer with their sound guy so he didn't feel left out. (Which we thought was really sweet.) And then they capped it all off with Cole Alexander smashing his guitar to bits and throwing it into the crowd. -- Molly Bergen

See also: The Black Lips' Cole Alexander Goes Full Monty at Coachella, Plays Guitar With His Ding-Dong

Master P Cameos During A$AP Rocky's Set: Sorry, but drinking a beer and swaying to Radiohead really was boring us. We made a beeline for A$AP Rocky's show instead, and were surprised to see the tent only about half-full. It stayed that way throughout his almost hour-long set, even though the Harlem rapper's performance was quite engaging. (Also, girls were taking off their tops.)

In any case, things got awesome when A$AP brought out Master P; we felt like we were an extra in the "Make 'Em Say Uhh" video, with plenty of room to throw elbows. -- Rebecca Haithcoat

Kasabian: Most British bands know how to rock. They also know how to bring their A-games to gigantic festivals. Kasabian's performance Saturday evening at the Mojave tent inspired concertgoers to jump and thrash with reckless abandon. The funky riffs of closer "Fire" mesmerized the crowd and when the music stopped, fans were left disappointed and confused. What could top that? -- Daniel Kohn

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