Hey, The Kids Like It

Rap-Metal Is Back...and It's Good

Page 2 of 2

I'll be the first to slam '90s rap-metal. Even those who hand in inventing it, like Mike Patton of Faith No More, came out strongly against it; he famously once said, "don't blame me for that shit." Yet his part in its creation is undeniable thanks to the massive success that was "Epic."

And "Epic," along with various other experiments in the idea like Sonic Youth's "Kool Thing" with Chuck D, Anthrax and Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise," and Run DMC's version of "Walk This Way," proved that the idea could work. It just...didn't.

As bands copied the idea, not just collaborating with rappers but making it a vital part of their sound as rappers and DJs became full-fledged members, it became increasingly trite and awful. You may feel nostalgic for Linkin Park, but go listen to Hybrid Theory again. It was shit. Search your feelings; you know it to be true.

But here we are in 2014, and that generation who grew up on that kind of music, who have been influenced by it and are unashamedly fans of it, are now creating. The most bizarre thing is that they're creating well.

Maybe it's because of how far metal has come since then. One of the most aggravating things about the original rap-metal movement was how it tried to combine bad rapping with bad Pantera-esque groove-metal riffage.

These new bands are drawing instead on death metal and technical metal influences to shape their riffs, and apparently have been paying attention to better rappers over the years. After all, rap has come a long way since the '90s, too.

Story continues on the next page.

KEEP THE HOUSTON PRESS FREE... Since we started the Houston Press, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Houston, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Corey Deiterman