Best of Houston

The Rest of the Best: Houston's Top 5 Piano Bars

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4. PROHIBITION

Weekly burlesque shows, swing dancing and an emphasis on craft cocktails? Oh my. Prohibition is proud to further romanticize this era, and customers follow suit, showing up dressed in fedoras and suspenders, cigar in hand.

But Prohibition isn't just a piano bar; stop by on Sunday for brunch and tea, and the upstairs area, dubbed the "Voyager Room," is available for private parties as well. Reservations are required for the burlesque shows and encouraged at all other times. 5175 Westheimer, 281-940-4636, www.prohibitionhouston.com

3. PETE'S DUELING PIANO BAR

Next door to House of Blues' Bronze Peacock Room is this little gem, a favorite for bachelor/bachelorette parties, birthday parties and anyone willing to bribe the musicians onstage with a few bucks to hear their favorite tunes. The pianists' repertoires are plentiful, but if they can't play your song, they will offer to play something similar or another tune by the artist you've requested.

Despite its size, Pete's can get pretty packed on a busy night, especially on weekends or after an event at House of Blues, so if large crowds and immobility aren't your thing, it may be best to show up early, before all the seats are taken. 1201 Fannin, 713-337-7383, www.petesduelingpianobar.com

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Matt is a regular contributor to the Houston Press’ music section. He graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in print journalism and global business. Matt first began writing for the Press as an intern, having accidentally sent his resume to the publication's music editor instead of the news chief. After half a decade of attending concerts and interviewing musicians, he has credited this fortuitous mistake to divine intervention.
Contact: Matthew Keever