A Tale Of Aggies, Viagra And Sheep

What do you get when you cross Aggies, Viagra and a bunch of female sheep? If you said "a groundbreaking biological study that could mean a sea-change in the promotion of human fetal development," you'd be exactly right. (What, were you thinking this was some sort of sheep-fucker joke? Not cool, man. Not cool.)

Clever -- and possibly bored -- scientists at Texas A&M recently released findings of a study showing that Viagra "enhanced blood flow in pregnant female sheep, helping send vital amino acids and other nutrients needed in fetal development. The study's results not only will assist with solving fetal development problems in other livestock, but possibly in humans," according to an Aggie press release.

One of the scientists behind the study, Guoya Wu, told Hair Balls that none of the male sheep were given Viagra. Which we think is sorta unfair.

Wu says the idea for the study was simple enough: Viagra works by increasing blood flow. So what if they took that boner technology and applied to fetal development, because a fetus relies on nutrients delivered via the mother's blood.

The study involved mating about 60 ewes to rams at -- we're not making this up -- the Texas A&M University Sheep Center. Wu said the next step would be to try similar studies on pigs, cows and humans. Which could ultimately mean that, one day, you'll be getting a little Viagra with your bacon. That's what we call a balanced breakfast. 

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Contributor Craig Malisow covers crooks, quacks, animal abusers, elected officials, and other assorted people for the Houston Press.
Contact: Craig Malisow