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Fort Bend County Judge KP George announced that a Fort Bend County man had been charged with a third-degree felony for shooting a dog twice in the face last December. Clarence, the dog shot in the incident, has fully recovered and joined George in a Friday press conference.
Fort Bend County Judge KP George announced that a Fort Bend County man had been charged with a third-degree felony for shooting a dog twice in the face last December. Clarence, the dog shot in the incident, has fully recovered and joined George in a Friday press conference.
Screenshot from Facebook Live

Felony Charge Made in Fort Bend County Dog Shooting Case

After a six-month investigation, justice appears to be on the horizon for Clarence, a 10-year-old Staffordshire Terrier who was shot twice in the face this past December and as a result, lost an eye.

In a Friday morning press conference, Fort Bend County Judge KP George was joined by Fort Bend County Precinct 3 Constable Wayne Thompson to announce that Timothy Holloway had been charged with third-degree felony cruelty to non-livestock animals after confessing that he had shot Clarence.

“Many people were involved in this investigation,” said Wayne. “It took a long time, but this week we have a lot of smiling faces.”

On December 21, 2019, Fort Bend County law enforcement found Clarence suffering from two gunshot wounds to the head in a cage on Harlem Road. Clarence had several infections and significant damage to his face, and required surgery to remove his left eye and bullet fragments from his head.

Six months later, after an investigation led by Howard Kreusel, Fort Bend County’s animal cruelty investigator, a warrant was served for the arrest of Holloway, 32, of Fort Bend County. While in police custody, Holloway confessed to shooting Clarence, and now faces up to two to ten years in prison and a $10,000 fine if convicted.

Wayne said that Holloway was courteous and respectful during his interrogation, but didn't explain why he shot Clarence. He also thanked George for pushing for the creation of the animal cruelty investigator position that helped crack the case.

A happy and healthy Clarence joined George, Thompson, county Animal Services Director Rene Vasquez and county District Attorney Brian Middleton at Friday’s press conference. Clarence is currently being trained to be a support dog for students in Fort Bend ISD, said a representative from Wag Again Rescue, the group taking care of Clarence.

“The bottom line of this discussion today is simple: in Fort Bend County, we love our pets,” said George. “They are there for a reason, and we will not tolerate any type of cruelty toward these animals.”

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