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Even After Leaving, Manziel Still Dominates SEC Conversation

HOOVER, Alabama -- The question was irrelevant, but Johnny Manziel hardly was. After delivering his opening statement at Southeastern Conference Media Days, the first question Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin answered -- or heard, rather -- was about his Heisman Trophy-winning former quarterback, Manziel.

"What is it like not coaching Johnny Manziel?" a reporter asked. "Do you miss him? Whoever your quarterback is, how confident are you he'll be a play-maker for you?"

"Let me get this straight," Sumlin said, "the question was, 'What's it like not coaching Johnny Manziel?'"

Sumlin dismissed the question as irrelevant, only to be asked a short while later if he'd seen Manziel's latest party pictures, and if he'd talked to his old quarterback.

"Is this the SEC Media Days?" Sumlin asked. "No, that's a great question about the Cleveland Browns. Anybody else got something?"

Even though he's a professional now, college football isn't ready to let go of Manziel. Sumlin heard questions about Manziel. Aggie offensive lineman Cedric Ogbuehi answered questions about Manziel. Defensive back Deshazor Everett explained how the offense looked without Johnny.

The offense won't change, Ogbuehi said. The new quarterbacks look good, Everett said.

Hell, punter Drew Kaser listened to questions from the media. He told them he's from Cleveland and that Johnny could grab a home-cooked meal anytime.

There were questions about special teams, too. But only after a few more about Manziel.

"How much is the program kind of ready to move on (from Manziel) -- get into the next era of A&M football?" a reporter asked Kaser.

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Kaser answered the question politely, saying these Aggies were the 2014 Aggies.

The A&M players might be sick of answering questions about their old QB, but they didn't show it the way their coach did.

Maybe that's because they know a better way to avoid answering questions, a way they learned from The Most Popular Man Not in Hoover Tuesday:

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