Longform

Jana's story

June 28, 1996: Jana Dreyer was about to turn 14, and she didn't want to spend Friday night with her mom. A senior at Brenham High School was hosting a graduation party at a rental hall called Bilski's Camphouse that night. Jana wanted to attend the party instead. She and her mother argued about it. For one thing, there were dinner plans. For another, Jana was scheduled to do a modeling shoot for the Page Parkes agency in Houston early the next morning.

But Jana was willful, and eager to start hanging out with the older high school crowd. She'd been back in Brenham for only a single school year after eight years in Dallas. Jana would be a freshman once summer ended. She was ready to start meeting her peers for the next four years.

Jana finally won out when she provided assurances that she would be chaperoned by her boyfriend and his father.

Jana rode to the party with the young man and his dad. There were maybe 350 people there, a lot of recently graduated seniors and some older kids from local Blinn College, where Jana's grandfather was athletic director (Blinn's baseball field, which he designed, was named after him).

Jana knew a few people present, but not most. Kids wandered the grounds and talked in cliques and dived into the camphouse refrigerator for the vodka and Everclear Jell-O shots that seemed to be the party's intoxicant of choice. The parents present mostly drank beer.

Jana stuck with the Jell-O shots. She says she probably downed eight or nine during the evening. Mingling, she lost track of her date and his father in the crowd and was introduced by a friend to a group of boys.

Standing around a keg were soon-to-be-seniors Matt Kenjura, the star quarterback of the Brenham High School Cubs, baseball team captain Matt McIntyre, their friend Bryce Pflughaupt, and a fourth, younger boy. If there was an in crowd at Brenham High -- and there was -- this was it.

Jana already knew who they were. Her friend Lindsay Thaler had an older brother the same age as Kenjura, McIntyre and Pflughaupt, and Thaler had brought a yearbook into English class to show Jana how cute she thought the boys were, especially Pflughaupt. The two girls had written notes back and forth about the older boys.



The boys suggested leaving the party to grab something to eat. Jana, feeling the effects of the Everclear and having lost her ride, asked if she could get a lift home. They piled into Pflughaupt's Ford Explorer. Jana sat in a backseat, leaning her head back on the rest with her eyes closed, trying to maintain a drunken equilibrium as the Explorer bumped down the dirt road away from Bilski's and back to the pavement.

Jana remembers seeing trees and then noticing a lack of lights passing overhead. She asked where they were going. One of the boys told her not to worry, they were just going for a little drive. And then the Explorer stopped. Jana recognized that they were somewhere on the manicured grounds of the Brenham Country Club, just outside the city limits. Her family held a membership.

The boys got out of the Explorer. Jana thinks they were popping open cans of beer. She said she wanted to lie down. Needed to sleep. Her head was pounding. One of the boys flipped a lever and folded down the seat so Jana could crawl into the back and rest.

She heard voices outside the Explorer, as if from a distance, in the drunken way in which you can hear people talking, but not what they say. She nodded off.



She nodded back in when a light above her in the truck's cargo bay came on. McIntyre had opened the Explorer's hatchback. He was crawling into the back with Jana, on top of her, kissing her neck and fondling her. Jana told him to leave her alone, she just wanted to sleep. McIntyre continued. Jana tried to shove him off but couldn't. She says her head felt like a stone and her arms would barely follow her wasted brain's commands. She said no, but he didn't stop. She felt her pants being pulled off, and her panties; her shoes must have already gone. She said don't, leave me alone, I don't want to do this, and then, suddenly, the 13-year-old girl was no longer a virgin.

She remembers Kenjura, the quarterback, yelling at McIntyre to hurry up, he wanted his turn, and then shortly, he got it. She remembers his eyes being cold and sweat dripping off his face into her eyes, and finally ceasing to struggle, biting her lip and pretending that this was happening not to her, but to somebody else. She remembers the younger boy saying to his friends that this wasn't right, we shouldn't be doing this, and being ignored, just like Jana.

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Brad Tyer