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Moving On Up: Houston Real Estate Valued at More Than $10 million

Ready to upgrade your humble abode? Here's a look at seven properties in the Houston area listed at more than $10 million. We've heard of 30-year mortgages, but do lenders ever offer 10,000-year mortgages?

This Georgian home at 7 Winston Woods is described as a "classic John Staub grand country house" and includes seven or eight bedrooms and nine full bathrooms. The gardens are beautifully manicured, there's a lovely trompe l'oeil cloud-filled sky on the living room's tray ceiling, and the entry shows a spectacular domical vault ceiling. The current listing price is $10.4 million.

Imagine driving home to this French chateau at 306 East Friar Tuck Lane at the end of a grueling day in the C-suite. The aerial view of this one is a show-stopper, resembling one of those paparazzi drone shots over a Kardashian wedding. The exterior sports French limestone imported from Europe; and the kitchen features Carrara marble, a fireplace and even a chandelier. The closets are tony enough to pass for a Beverly Hills clothier, and add-ons include an elevator, gym, wine cellar and media room. The current listing price is $12.5 million.

Convenient to River Oaks Country Club and St. John's School, this classic mansion at 3711 Willowick features an underground wine cellar and tasting room, a cathedral ceiling game room and a bright solarium. There's a quaint attic bedroom and an expansive lawn that will keep your groundskeeper very busy. The current listing price is $12.8 million.

Imagine the ruckus in River Oaks when attorney Tony Buzbee hosted Donald Trump for a fund-raiser at his home at 1722 River Oaks Boulevard, especially when the busload of protesters showed up. This elegant Georgian-style home happens to be situated right across the street at 1721 River Oaks. The adage "location, location, location" seems to be pertinent in this instance. The interiors are especially ornate, with a heavy dose of floral wallpaper, and the tiered media room makes for a nice touch. The current listing price is $16.95 million.

This neoclassical estate at 2115 River Oaks Boulevard is steeped in history, and was once owned by Baron Ricky di Portanova and Baroness Alessandra di Portanova, formerly Sandra Hovas. For her birthday, he erected a magnificent natatorium in the backyard, creating 12,000 square feet of air-conditioned entertaining space. His mother, Lillie, was the daughter of Hugh Roy Cullen, and his father was Baron Paolo di Portanova of Italy. In a New York Times obituary, the baron was described as "one of the most flamboyant members of the international jet set." The current listing price is $17.9 million

This Georgian home was designed by Harrie T. Lindeberg and his protégé, John Staub, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Positioned near Main Street and the Sam Houston Monument in Hermann Park, this tree-lined home is classic and refined, lacking any of the nouveau riche gaudiness. The dining room features Jean Zuber-designed large-scale scenic block-print wallpaper panels. The current listing price is $18 million.

No, this isn't swampland in Florida, and it's not an April Fools' joke either. This tract features 150 acres of undeveloped land near State Highway 288 and Almeda-Genoa Road. No worries about flooding from Sims Bayou, as the land has been raised three inches to remove it from any flood zone. We're not really sure how the neighbors feel about that. It's located in Key Map 573K, and the area is described as "Medical Center South," which seems a bit generous, but there you go. It's yours for a cool $25 million.

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