A few more weeks of the puffy clouds of summer.
A few more weeks of the puffy clouds of summer.
Photo by Jeff Turner via Flickr

Weather Week: Cool Front, but No Cooler Temperatures

Entering the third week in August, temperatures remain at right about normal for this time of year. That is to say it is hot and humid throughout the area. But, the first inklings of fall in the form of a late August cool front are in the forecast this week. Just not necessarily for us.

Looking back at the weekend, it was hot and humid with afternoon showers. Days like this tend to blend together this time of year. It gets really hot, a shower or two falls and then it gets hot again. That's August in Houston. A few areas saw some showers over the weekend, but they were widely scattered and due to afternoon heating.

Moving into the start of the week, and the start of school for quite a few kids, there is a bit of rain in the forecast and it's attached to a cool front moving into Texas. Yes, a legitimate cool front that will be great if you live in the central plains but won't mean much for Houston.

But, what it will do is increase our chances for rain Monday and into Tuesday a bit. Unfortunately, it isn't expected to get all the way this far south and, as a result, there won't be much of a let up in the heat. In fact, by Wednesday, high pressure should build in and we could see temperatures near the century mark. And that same high pressure should tamp down our rain chances.

Still, as August rounds to a close, there are signs we could start seeing some slightly cooler weather within the next month. Long range forecasts are calling for slightly below average temperatures central, south and portions of east Texas. Additionally, those same forecasters are calling for a much cooler temperatures than average come November.

But, that is still weeks away. For now, we will need to deal with the heat like we always do, by staying inside.

Watching the Tropics

The entire Atlantic Basin is quiet despite this being the busiest portion of the hurricane season, statistically. We have about three weeks left before the statistical peak of the season after which chances begin to drop precipitously. In this case, no news is truly good news.

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