Weather

Hundreds of Thousands Without Power This Morning Thanks to Nicholas

A lot of people without power this morning and probably more to come.
A lot of people without power this morning and probably more to come. Screenshot
As Nicholas skipped around Monday night, it briefly settled into hurricane status before hitting the Gulf Coast and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people in Houston and surrounding areas south and east of the city.

As of 6:30 a.m. Tuesday, CenterPoint Energy was still reporting 413,179 customers without power, with the heaviest concentrations inside Houston and in Galveston, which received nearly 14 inches of rain. With gusts of wind continuing through the morning, it was likely that more homes and businesses would lose power. Flooding was concentrated to the south and east of the city.

According to Space City Weather, the center of the once again tropical storm was due to pass over Houston this morning with maximum sustained winds still in the 70 mph range at 4 a.m.

Local officials — Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo — each held separate Monday night press conferences to urge Houston area residents to stay off the roads. A number of schools and services closed for Tuesday in anticipation of the weather.


As the storm moves through the city, it is headed to Louisiana, still in recovery from Hurricane Ida and far from ready for the additional rain it will bring to that state.

In a 7:30 p.m. address Monday, Turner thanked performer Harry Styles for calling off his sold-out concert Monday night that was to take place at Toyota Center in the interests of safety.  Styles sent out a tweet asking his fans to "please go home and be safe."

CenterPoint Energy crews that had been sent to Louisiana to help restore power after Hurricane Ida were sent back to Texas to handle the anticipated outages. 
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Margaret Downing is the editor-in-chief who oversees the Houston Press newsroom and its online publication. She frequently writes on a wide range of subjects.
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