^
Keep Houston Press Free
4

Harris County Democrats’ HQ Vandalized On Eve of Election

A seemingly Communist screed was found painted on the Harris County Democratic Party headquarters Monday morning.
A seemingly Communist screed was found painted on the Harris County Democratic Party headquarters Monday morning.
Photo by Harris County Democratic Party

The Harris County Democratic Party discovered on the eve of Election Day that its offices had been targeted by vandals over the weekend, according to a Monday announcement from the local party.

In addition to filling the building’s locks with Super Glue, the criminals scrawled “ELECTIONS NO, REVOLUTION YES” and “DON’T VOTE” along with a Soviet hammer and sickle symbol in bright red spray paint on the front of the HCDP headquarters, and left a massive splash of red paint on the HQ’s front door.

Local Democrats found their office covered in red paint with Super Glued locks on Monday morning.
Local Democrats found their office covered in red paint with Super Glued locks on Monday morning.
Photo by Harris County Democratic Party

In a statement issued Monday, Harris County Democratic Party Chair Lillie Schechter accused local conservatives of being responsible for the act.

“This is what happens when Republicans are losing. They use scare tactics and intimidation to scare voters,” said Schechter.

I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Houston and help keep the future of Houston Press free.

“This will not distract us from our mission to elect Democrats up and down the ballot, making people’s lives better by enacting positive progressive policy,” Schechter continued.

Interestingly, nearly identical messages to the ones scrawled on the local Democrats’ headquarters were found over the weekend in Pennsylvania, according to local reports cited by the Texas Tribune.

On Saturday, the same seemingly Communist screed was found painted on the home of Sean Parnell, Republican candidate for U.S. House District 17 in Pennsylvania, and the office of incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle, who is up for reelection. Differently phrased anti-voting, pro-revolution graffiti was also found on Monday at the office of Pennsylvania U.S. Congressman Sean Lamb, a Democrat.

It’s unclear who is responsible for any of these acts of vandalism, and whether or not they were real honest-to-God Communists or false flag-planting conservatives as Shechter contended. No matter the culprit, it goes to show that tensions are high across the country ahead of an Election Day like no other. Here's hoping that we don't see anything more scary than spray paint and Super Glue deployed by angry U.S. residents or local law enforcement in the sure to be volatile days ahead.

Keep the Houston Press Free... Since we started the Houston Press, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Houston, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Houston with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Press community and help support independent local journalism in Houston.

 

Join the Press community and help support independent local journalism in Houston.