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Astros' Osuna Accepts Peace Bond, Charges Withdrawn in Domestic Assault Case

Astros GM Jeff Lunhow is undoubtedly glad to put Roberto Osuna's criminal charges behind them, but fans will remain wary.
Astros GM Jeff Lunhow is undoubtedly glad to put Roberto Osuna's criminal charges behind them, but fans will remain wary.
Photo by Jack Gorman

On Tuesday with the Astros in Toronto for a series against the Blue Jays, closer Roberto Osuna appeared in Canadian court for a hearing on the charges stemming from an alleged domestic assault earlier this year between the player and the mother of his daughter.

The Crown (as they refer to the state in Canada) withdrew their charges and Osuna agreed to a $500 Peace Bond, which is something akin to probation combined with a restraining order. Osuna will be required to keep his distance from the woman who alleged the assault and stay out of trouble for the next year.

According to reports, the complainant did not want to come forward and press charges. She is apparently living in Mexico now and has stated that she would like to remain a co-parent with Osuna going forward.

In a statement, the Astros said they "remain committed to increase our support regarding the issues of domestic violence and abuse of any kind.” For his part, Osuna, in a statement, said he was glad to move on with his life adding, “I will make no further comments about this matter, as I plan on moving past this and look only to the future.”

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While this may have closed the book on the legal issues for the Astros closer, it didn't exactly clear up what happened to not only get him charged in the first place, but to cause MLB to suspend him for 75 games prior to joining the team just prior to the trading deadline. Questions will no doubt continue to swirl around his play for some time.

In his return to Toronto Monday night, he was roundly booed every time he had the ball in his hand. He did pick up the save and inched the Astros to within two games of clinching the division.

Since the Astros traded for him, Osuna has been largely quiet and kept a pretty low profile despite his dominance on the field. There have been few visible protests and only a smattering of boos at Minute Maid Park for the young closer since joining the team. Still, many fans on social media and elsewhere remain uneasy in their rooting interests for both the team and the player.

As the saying goes, winning cures all, but in the #MeToo era, and with so little information available about the incident that landed Osuna in hot water to begin with, it will take more than winning for the Astros and Osuna to move on from this.

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