Wine Time

10 Things Every Self-Respecting Wine Lover Should Know About Prosecco

Can you imagine a wine world without Prosecco? Just a few decades ago, Prosecco was hardly known beyond the city of Venice where it is liberally consumed and the province of Treviso where it is produced. Today, exports of Prosecco rival those of Champagne, in both volume and sales numbers.

The Prosecco boom of the 1980s and 1990s is owed to a handful of forward-thinking négociant producers who envisioned its potential in English- and German-speaking markets.

But recent changes in appellation regulations and deceptive marketing practices have created growing confusion among consumers and tradespeople alike.

Here are 10 Things Every Self-Respecting Wine Lover Should Know About Prosecco.

10. In 2009, three townships were included in the newly created Prosecco DOCG, the highest designation in the Italian appellation system: Valdobbiadene, Conegliano, and Asolo, hilltop towns that abound with steep slopes ideal for growing Glera grapes for Prosecco.

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Jeremy Parzen writes about wine and modern civilization for the Houston Press. A wine trade marketing consultant by day, he is also an adjunct professor at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Piedmont, Italy. He spends his free time writing and recording music with his daughters and wife in Houston.
Contact: Jeremy Parzen