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A Rare Request at Goode Company Hamburgers & Taqueria

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In my ongoing quest to sample Houston's burger offerings, I made my first visit to Goode Company Hamburgers & Taqueria, where I enjoyed my two-thirds-pound burger with Swiss cheese and grilled onions. But getting it cooked rare was a colossal pain in the ass.

The clerk and I had the following exchange:

Clerk: How would you like that cooked?

Me: Rare. Definitely rare. Pink. Rare. Can you do that?

Clerk: Sure thing!

And, of course, then I felt like a jerk. I had recently been burned at Natachee's, where I was served a burger very well done after requesting it medium-rare. But that was no excuse for being obnoxious.

Five minutes later, the clerk handed me my takeout bag and smiled. "Thank you so much!," I said, trying to make up for my earlier bitchiness. "Smells great!"

As I loaded up on ketchup and relish at the toppings bar, I couldn't help but double-check: both 1/3 burgers were brown-gray, through and through. Even a little burned on top.

Oh, holy Jesus.

I didn't send my overcooked burger back at Natachee's because I was pressed for time, but this evening I was willing to wait. I approached the clerk, apprised him of the situation, asking for a redo. "Sorry," I said. "It's just I paid $10 for this burger." But the price tag had little to do with it. It was the fact my request was ignored.

The clerk apologized, and I received a fresh order, this time properly (under)cooked. The meat was very well-spiced and wonderfully juicy; I also very much liked the grilled onions and the fluffy egg bun.

Do you think my request was ignored because of my tone? Or is this par for the course at Goode Burgers & Taqueria? Is requesting a "rare" just asking for trouble? All of the above?

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