Leftovers

The Soda Fountain That Time Forgot

Driving by Huston's Drugs on Washington Avenue, it's easy to miss the small drugstore despite its royal blue, fantastically retro sign. Although the drugstore closed down sometime in the mid-1990s -- forsaking its soda fountain and all its other contents to the ravages of time -- not much had changed inside the little place prior to that point. The shelves don't appear to have been restocked since at least the 1980s, and most of the paraphernalia inside looks even older than that.

A peek inside the mid-century building reveals a look at exactly what one would imagine when thinking of a 1950s-era drugstore and soda fountain: a long counter on one side, lined with stools and bright silver machines that once operated under the trained hand of a soda jerk; a pharmacy section in the rear, its shelves lined with amber-colored bottles with metal screw caps; aisles in the middle of the store stocked with all manner of merchandise, from hair cream and earrings to books and children's toys. All of it is now yellowed with age and covered with a downy layer of dust, but it's all oddly intact and painfully lonely inside the derelict store.

According to the sleuthsters on HAIF, Huston's Drugs is currently owned by the Gantt family, which inherited the property from their mother, Lois, when she passed away in 2007. Lois Gantt inherited the drugstore herself in the mid-1980s and appears to have given up keeping the small store alive just a decade later.

After the jump, take a look inside the soda fountain that time forgot.

KEEP THE HOUSTON PRESS FREE... Since we started the Houston Press, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Houston, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Katharine Shilcutt