Food Fight

UPDATED: As Fees Become Problematic, Restaurants Move Away from OpenTable, But Do They Stay Away?

A few more people in the local restaurant industry chimed in with their thoughts on OpenTable after this article was originally published. You can now read their comments on the next page.

Imagine you own a restaurant, and you want to fill seats. You need to get people to make reservations. So you turn to OpenTable, the number one online reservation software.

It's been around since 1998, so it's had plenty of time to work out the kinks. Nearly 27,000 restaurants around the country use the service to make it quick and convenient for guests to make reservations, even when the restaurants is closed. To many, OpenTable seems like the best bet.

But lately, many restaurants have been switching to other, smaller reservation services due to prohibitive fees from OpenTable. Signing up for the service costs $1,295 just for the software, which OpenTable requires restaurants use. Then there's a monthly fee of $199. Add another $99 a month onto that if you want to be featured in OpenTable's dining guide. It's 25 cents for every reservation booked from the restaurant's website, and $1 for every reservation that comes directly from OpenTable or partner sites like Yelp. On top of that, there's a point system wherein diners earn more points if they book through OpenTable's website. It costs the restaurants more, but diners love it.

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Kaitlin Steinberg