Top

dining

Stories

 

Yummy Stinky

The fermented tofu at this Taiwanese spot is not for the faint of heart.

 See more photos from Yummy Kitchen's tidy dining room and kitchen in our slideshow.

Taiwanese food is not for the faint of heart. That could be one of the reasons I had difficulty finding dining companions to go with me to Yummy Kitchen. After all, the cuisine is famous for implementing a number of cringe-worthy ingredients, from goose blood to stinky tofu.

One man's trash is another man's treasure, though. And although I'm only a fan of blood in certain applications (blood sausage, for one), I am a resolute fan of stinky tofu. It's both a staple and a delicacy in Taiwan, and certainly a polarizing food that epitomizes the trash-versus-treasure argument.

If you fear stinky tofu, try the gua bao (back).
Troy Fields
If you fear stinky tofu, try the gua bao (back).

Location Info

Map

Yummy Kitchen

9326 Bellaire Blvd.
Houston, TX 77036

Category: Restaurant > Taiwanese

Region: Outer Loop - SW

Details

Hours: 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. daily.
Ma-pow tofu: $5.95
General Tso's chicken: $7.95
Pan-fried pork dumplings: $4.95
Steamed pork buns: $3.95
Stinky tofu: $3.95
Cuttlefish in brown sauce: $7.95
Intestines with ginger: $7.95


READ MORE
BLOG POST: a href="http://blogs.houstonpress.com/eating/2011/08/metropole_center_three_favorit.php">Metropole Center: Three Favorites in One
SLIDESHOW: Yummy Kitchen Lives Up to Its Name

Stinky tofu is made by fermenting tofu — which, it should be said, is as normal a protein in Asian cuisines as pork, chicken or beef, and not used as a meat substitute or as health food — in a brine that is fairly disgusting in and of itself. Fermented milk, dried shrimp, amaranth, mustard greens and more combine to create a potent liquid that imparts a strong, manure-like scent to the tofu. It's intoxicating.

I ended up solving my dining-partner problem by simply tricking unwitting coworkers and family members into going with me to Yummy Kitchen. Taiwanese food is just like Chinese food, right? Right! Okay, get in the car! And everything was fine, both times, until the stinky tofu hit the table.

"Wow, man," said my coworker Craig, clearly at a loss for words but not wanting to insult either me or the lovely Taiwanese woman who'd brought our meal to the table. "Those intestines smell awful." I chuckled.

Pointing at the plate of stir-fried intestines with ginger that I'd ordered for us, I said, "You mean this stuff? This isn't what you're smelling." I gestured to the plate of deep-fried cubes of stinky tofu. "That's what you're smelling."

As if to prove me wrong, Craig leaned in for a whiff and came back reeling. "Oh my God. You're right." Still, ever the trooper, he picked up a square with his chopsticks and ate one half of it. He grimaced while chewing, and had nothing to say when he'd finally swallowed. It was the last bite of stinky tofu he had that evening. He busied himself instead with the barbecue pork buns in thick, fluffy jackets and the slivers of intestine that were pale and plump, softer than usual yet still with a firm bite. I ate my cubes quite happily, cubes that tasted vaguely of dank, dark, musty places, places that had never seen daylight.

I'm the same person who looks for that quality in other foods, though. I'm the person who wants a Pinot Noir with a strong, disarming funk of barnyards and manure to come through at the nose. I'm the person who wants to surround myself with washed rind cheeses, the stinkier the better. And while these wines and cheeses are accepted indulgences in our Western culinary world, stinky tofu is unfairly treated as a vulgar, disgusting thing. At least with stinky tofu, you know what you're getting right from the start. No hypocrisy here.
_____________________

The greatest thing about Taiwanese food is how eagerly it makes use of available ingredients — cuttlefish, pig and goose blood, oysters, squid — and how it rewards stalwart diners who embrace the cuisine as a whole. For every dish of cuttlefish in brown sauce (which is almost certainly as much an acquired taste as the tofu), there are two mindblowingly magnificent dishes waiting in the wings.

Yummy Kitchen is quickly becoming famous for its pan-fried pork dumplings and its gua bao, steamed pork belly buns that are filled with soft, fatty belly, pickled greens and a nutty-sweet topping of crushed peanuts and sugar. Gua bao are also called Taiwanese burgers, both for their wide availability on the streets of Taiwan as well as for their quick, fast, finger-food nature: meat with a few vital toppings in a bun.

My friend and occasional dining companion Dr. Ricky is the one who first turned me on to the gua bao at Yummy Kitchen. But it appears that gua bao is coming into its own right now, seen everywhere from Americanized pan-Asian places like Dragon Bowl to ultra-high-end restaurants like New York City's Momofuku, where executive chef David Chang first introduced the Taiwanese snack food to a broader American audience. Just last week on Serious Eats, J. Kenji Lopez-Alt wrote: "Momofuku might have made steamed pork buns cool (if not small and expensive), but there are still places where they fulfill their original goal: a cheap, delicious, workingman's lunch." Yummy Kitchen is one of those places.

Like gua bao, Yummy Kitchen is just now getting a lot of attention, which is funny considering that the restaurant has been in the Metropole Plaza since 2009. It's lately been the talk of Twitter, and nearly half of its reviews on Yelp are from the last few months. Perhaps an influx of equally excellent neighbors has helped spur them on: Mala Sichuan, a popular new Chinese restaurant, is almost next door, and the always-busy Six Ping Bakery is just across the parking lot.

1
 
2
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
17 comments
Sonama38
Sonama38

I am a Yummy Kitchen regular, and want to say they have the best Taiwanese street food in all Houston Chinatown!

Larry Katz
Larry Katz

Half the review is devoted to telling us how cool Ms. S. is for liking stinky tofu. Of course, many previous reviews have emphasized how cool she is, but this time, we find out that she is way cooler than her parents! They just don't get it!!! Could someone remind Miss Kate that we read restaurant reviews to learn about food and restaurants? Instead of propping up her self esteem by telling us how cool she is, she could do it by writing useful reviews. But alas, her knowledge of food is shallow, and her opinions of restaurants are undependable. Can't the Press do better than this?

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

In the musical, Flower Drum Song, there is a song entitled Chop Suey. In the musical, the song is sung by those in the "older generation " of Chinese imigrants in San Francisco who are confused and confounded by the Americanization of their culture by their first generation born children. The dish that was found on virtually every Chinese restaurant that was operating when Flower Drum Song was first produced and that was a mainstay on the "foreign food " isle of most grocery stores was Kung King brand's canned version of Chop Suey. From the song we learned that there is no authentic Chinese dish called chop suey, but that it was a dish made in Chinse restaurants in America to satisfy American tastes or at least what the Chinese immigrants thought were American tastes. General Tso's Chicken is a more modern dish that was also created by restauranteurs in America to satisfy American tastes or what are thought might be American tastes. If a restaurant reviewer wants to be serious about her work and considered to have some level of expertise that allows her to educate her readers about cuisines that are or can be new and exciting because they are being introduced to America as being representative of a particular culture and local, the reviewer should write about those dishes. For those interested in the history of Chinese food and its very interesting role in American culture and how American culture influenced the Chinese immigrant population I suggest the book, Fortune Cookie Chronicles by Jennifer 8. Lee that is mentioned in this article in Slate. http://www.salon.com/food/fran...

Rich
Rich

Nice review Katharine, I'm glad I had the chance to read about "stinky tofu". I'm not sure I'm going to run right out and get some, but I'm happy I have the chance to vicariously experience it through your review.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

Enough about General Tso's Chicken. General Tso's is to Chinese food as butter chicken or chicken tikka masala is to Indian food. Both are Western creations to satisfy Western tastes. It does not mean they are not good when eaten in a Chinese or Indian restaurant but such dishes should not necessarily be used to evaluate the quality of a particular ethnic restaurant that they are being served in as a classical dish of that ethnic group. I suggest if you and the family are really in desperate need of some General Tso's Chicken, go to the Lai Lai Dumpling House on Bellaire. It is one of the original Chinese restaurants on Bellaire. For about $7 you and the family can get a platter of crispy, sweet/spicy battered nuggests that sometimes even have pieces of chicken, but will always satisfy that sweet tooth.

Perhaps what you should do is devote an entire column to reviews of every Chinese food buffet and fast food place in town that has General Tso's Chicken on the menu so that we know exactly where to go for that dish and then those three words will never have to appear in a column again and you can move on to evaluating which place in town has the best sweet and sour pork.

trisch
trisch

Oh stinky tofu. Back when we were little, my dad would drag us to a Taiwanese restaurant in the Welcome Center for stinky tofu. We'd gag and suffer so much the owner would bring out a tabletop fan to fan the fumes away from us. When I was living in Sichuan a couple of years ago, I came across that familiar odor at an outdoor antiques market. "Don't worry," I told my non-Asian colleague, "one of the stalls is probably selling stinky tofu." I was wrong. What we were smelling was the cesspool of a stream flowing behind the market -- foamy, green and complete with human waste floaters. Stinky tofu. It's a huge part of my ethnic heritage, but try as I might, I haven't been able to bring myself to eat it. :(

Doc Ricky
Doc Ricky

So much to that menu beyond what is mentioned. Here are some recommendations:

1. Crispy Beef Cake. I know, the translation is hilarious, but it's good.2. The poorly named Chicken in Special Brown Sauce - this is chicken cooked in anise, ginger and garlic, served in a clay pot with Thai basil. 3. Green onion pancakes - the technique here is pretty good4. Pork in a bowl, Taichung Style - this is what Chinese would consider comfort food.

Then again, there's always the gua bao

http://food.drricky.net/2011/0...

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

No one is cooler than my parents. Especially not me. But it's always interesting to read the bizarre things that other people read into my writing. This time it's that I'm propping up my own self-esteem by trashing my badass parents who've done everything in this world for me and more. Yes, that's it!

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

Hey, hey, hey. You lay off Ms. S. She's my girl although sometimes I don't feel the love back.

Katharine Shilcutt
Katharine Shilcutt

My favorite part of this entire thing is that you have recommended a chicken-based dish to us that "sometimes even have pieces of chicken" in it.

Well done, sir or madam. Well done.

Tina
Tina

WTF? Is that all you read in the entire article - those three words? Then you went into a rant about General Tso's Chicken? Perhaps you should bother to read the entire thing and understand that she took someone along who could only handle something as pedestrian as General Tso's...so she kindly ordered it for him without judging. Man, sometimes the commentors on here seriously need remedial reading lessons.

Rich
Rich

Hey Attyrose3, I happen to like Katharine's reviews, this one included. How about when you get your own gig as a restaurant reviewer, you review whathever the heck you like. In the meantime I'm sure I'm not the only one who wishes you wouldn't be such a JERK!

Sihaya
Sihaya

#2 and #4 sound absolutely to-die-for.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

I refer you to other comments concerning this review. General Tso's Chicken is not believed to even be a dish created in Twaiwan so why would one even order it, much less devote a single word to it, in a review of a restaurant that specializes in Twianese cooking.

Attyrose3
Attyrose3

The point is, it is fine to order it if that is what her father wanted. It is fine to even enjoy it. But if one is writing a review of a restaurant that specializes in a particular cuisine, one does not review a throw away dish that is on the menu to accommodate the diners who are not up for trying the house specialities. It is the equivalent of going to a restaurant geared towards adults and reviewing the children's menu items that are there for the children that the restaurant owners were hoping would never even show up in the first place. The kids food should be good but it is likely not going to be what the restaurant specializes in or why most of the customers are there for.

Biker
Biker

Um, she ordered it for her father because that's all he wanted off the menu? Help me understand why this is cause for such snippyness. Should she not have mentioned that her father wanted this dish?? Good God.

Also, what other comments about General Tso's?

One more thing, spell check is a beautiful thing...employ it and enjoy it.

 
Loading...