Though not the most aesthetically pleasing cemetery in the city, this final resting place for the indigent and unidentified is especially moving. It's especially sad to consider that, with roughly 13,000 people buried over the site's 18 acres, the cemetery is almost out of room. For many souls buried here, their stories will never be fully known. Others met all-too-tragic fates, like an unidentified victim of notorious serial killers Dean Corll, Elmer Wayne Henley and David Brooks. The graveyard is a reminder that even people forgotten or forsaken deserve a proper burial, as well as a reminder that Harris County has the decency and dignity to provide that.
Hotel Galvez
Now the only historic beachfront hotel left on the Gulf Coast, the Hotel Galvez & Spa has just completed an $11 million renovation in celebration of its 100th anniversary. Owners George Mitchell and his family have made several updates to the property, modernizing it while maintaining its turn-of-the-century charm. The hotel's grand multi-paned windows have been restored to their original beauty, and a 9,000-plus-square-foot spa and poolside cabanas have been added along with a newly landscaped lawn called Centennial Green, positioned just outside the hotel's magnificent Music Hall. Each of the guest rooms has been redecorated with plush furnishings and nature-inspired prints by artist Kayla Mitchell, the talented granddaughter of George Mitchell. The Hotel Galvez was originally built in 1911 as a powerful symbol of the city's physical and economic recovery after the Great Storm devastated the island a decade earlier. A century later, the hotel, like Galveston Island, is not only surviving but flourishing.
Texans are used to high-profile criminal cases where, let's face it, the defendant is stone-cold guilty but has the means to get a supremely skilled and supremely expensive lawyer to bitch-slap a prosecutor's weak case. But what happens when that defendant isn't loaded, and the prosecutor is especially rabid, to the point where, exculpatory evidence be damned, he's going to get his man? How many lawyers want to step up to that plate? And how many lawyers want to step up to the plate after that defendant has been convicted? Fortunately for Anthony Graves, Nicole Casarez is one of those lawyers. Through the Innocence Project of Texas, she and her journalism students at the University of St. Thomas helped free Graves after he had spent nearly two decades on death row. Prosecutorial misconduct helped put him there; a lawyer with actual respect for the American criminal justice system helped get him out. Imagine that: saving an innocent man's life, not for a fat retainer but because you have the means and desire to. Isn't that the very definition of integrity?
Rice University may be known as one of the leading private universities in the South, but it's not known for being trill. Or it wasn't. This past spring, one of the greatest Southern rappers of all time doubled as a professor of Religious Studies, lecturing on the parallels between hip-hop and different faiths. Bun B, a Baptist, partnered up with Dr. Anthony B. Pinn, UGK fan and head of Rice's H.E.R.E. community-outreach program, to teach "Religious Studies 331: Religion and Hip-Hop Culture." The course grew out of Bun's guest lecture to one of Pinn's classes a couple of years ago, and the rapper responsible for "Gimme That Pussy" and "Pocket Full of Stones" (among many others) proved remarkably astute. "We're not talking about hip-hop and religion being the same," Bun said. "We're showing instances where hip-hop and religion have the same goals and ideology in common within the context of the culture."

(An earlier version of this item misspelled Dr. Anthony B. Pinn's last name. The Houston Press regrets the error.)

Attorney Jim Adler has built a reputation on loud commercials touting his legal acumen, likening his approach and effectiveness to that of a particular blunt-faced toolbox staple. But lately, he's been tinkering with a new metaphor: the junkyard dog. In what appears to be a spot filmed on location in an actual junkyard, Adler is practically frothing at the mouth, talking about how unscrupulous insurance companies and the like try to screw victims out of just pay, making him as mad as a junkyard dog. Then there are the obligatory/alleged past clients, vouching for how Adler is indeed like a junkyard dog. We've got to admit, it's appealing. If we felt we were being screwed out of unjust pay, we'd definitely want a vicious, bloodthirsty beast on our side. Still, it leaves room for confusion: He's a hammer; he's a junkyard dog; he's a hammer; he's a junkyard dog; he's a hammer and a junkyard dog.
Last year, the prosecution-lovin' judges on the Court of Criminal Appeals declared that the state's lower appellate courts could no longer reverse cases because of factual insufficiency — in essence, whenever the evidence was alarmingly weak but a jury had nevertheless convicted. Terry Jennings of the 1st Court of Appeals didn't take too kindly to the ruling. "This, respectfully, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has neither the jurisdiction nor any lawful authority to do," he wrote, before proceeding to — in a polite judicial way — tear the CCA a new you-know-what. Jennings, a former prosecutor, is no softhearted friend to criminals, but he's proven himself to be a valuable appellate judge.
If the traffic alone at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo gets you stressed, the event's new iPhone app, launched this year, might at least ease some of the pain of coordinating your visit to one of the biggest events in Houston. The app features driving directions, a way to map your parking spot in the concrete maze that is the Reliant complex, a full schedule of Rodeo events, online shopping for ticket sales and HLSR merch, and a friend-finder that allows parents to track their teenagers' whereabouts on the Rodeo grounds. Cleanly designed, full-featured and dead simple to use, the Texas-design app is the perfect way to bridge Rodeo tradition and the 21st century.
Sri Meenakshi Devasthanam
Inspired by the grand Meenakshi Temple in Madurai, India, this Pearland vision is dedicated to the Hindu goddess Meenakshi. The ornate carvings and curves of the buildings in the temple complex will sweep you away to sweltering Southern India, as will the spicy vegetarian fare on sale there. If you go, expect to do more than gawk, as when we visited out of curiosity one Sunday afternoon and were commandeered by a Hindi-speaking priest into making a pooja — a ritual offering. He said a few words and lit a candle or two, we gravely pretended we knew what was going on, and then he handed us a plastic bag containing a red apple and some rose petals. Days later, not knowing what else to do, we offered these items to Buffalo Bayou, and we have to say, life since has been pretty sweet. Thank you, Meenakshi!
Because most of them are aligned with Houston's waterways, most of Houston's bike trails run east-west. Getting north and south can be a dangerous chore, but many people believe the solution is relatively easy: convert miles and miles of Houston's utility easements for dual-purpose as bike (and hiking) trails. The snag has always been liability — CenterPoint Energy does not want to be held liable for any injuries that might occur on their land. Local attorney Tom McCasland took up that issue as his driving force for much of 2010 and 2011 and crusaded in Austin and Houston for a bill that would let CenterPoint out of bike-crash lawsuits and thus pave the way to a cycling paradise in Houston. While his effort was stymied in a committee in Austin, he believes that the momentum he gained this year will help ensure that his bill will pass in 2013.
Well, this certainly isn't a surprise: KHOU's Mark Greenblatt winning our Best TV News Reporter award. After all, he won it in 2008 and 2010. But if you're thinking we're stuck in a rut or something, in our defense the guy just keeps coming up with compelling investigative pieces that deservedly rack up high-profile awards. In the past it's been for stories on Metro and the Texas National Guard; this year his target has been the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, which he showed endeavored to hide test results showing too much radiation in our drinking water. He's definitely one reporter any government bureaucrat doesn't want to see pop up on his caller ID.

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