Cahill's On Durham
Cahill's on Durham It's all about the juxtaposition. In one stall of the men's bathroom you've got a Budweiser poster featuring supermodel Elsa Benitez -- typical fare for a sports bar. Over the urinal hangs a poster of a Harley-Davidson chick in a black leather jacket. This one looks like it came straight out of a truck-stop bathroom. But inside the other stall hangs beauty itself: a portrait of a buxom brunette framed with wooden veneer. Her hazel eyes gaze forward, surrounded by hair that cascades down until it rests upon her supple breasts. She's gorgeous. We've only got one question for Vincent, the artist of this photorealistic work: How much would it cost to get a version on velvet?

Jerry's World at Infernal Bridegroom Productions Based on the programs of Joe Frank -- a real-life radio personality dubbed "the most imaginative, literate monologist in radio" -- Jerry's World, like a strangely ecstatic tone poem, celebrates the dirty little corners of our contemporary landscape, in which life gets funnier as it gets more abstract and amorphous. Directed and adapted by Troy Schulze, the collage of scenes and monologues (all of which were either re-creations or recordings of dialogue from the actual radio program) stitches together anecdotes and rants, including cracks at long post office lines, overpaid athletes and oversexed teenage dance shows. Ultimately, the show is both a sonic experiment that redefines traditional theater and a mesmerizing symphony of language.

Jerry's World at Infernal Bridegroom Productions Based on the programs of Joe Frank -- a real-life radio personality dubbed "the most imaginative, literate monologist in radio" -- Jerry's World, like a strangely ecstatic tone poem, celebrates the dirty little corners of our contemporary landscape, in which life gets funnier as it gets more abstract and amorphous. Directed and adapted by Troy Schulze, the collage of scenes and monologues (all of which were either re-creations or recordings of dialogue from the actual radio program) stitches together anecdotes and rants, including cracks at long post office lines, overpaid athletes and oversexed teenage dance shows. Ultimately, the show is both a sonic experiment that redefines traditional theater and a mesmerizing symphony of language.

DiverseWorks A visiting performance artist once sent a note to DiverseWorks saying, "Once you've done DiverseWorks, you've done Texas." That's a mighty strong statement, but we agree that everyone should "do" DiverseWorks. Now in its 21st year, the funky, intimate performance space has brought consistently challenging and groundbreaking contemporary works to Houston. Homegrown shows like the experimental electronic music festival "Twelve Minutes Max" take shape here each season. But DiverseWorks also has introduced Houstonians to internationally recognized performance artists such as Miranda July and spoken-word celeb Marc Bamuthi Joseph. This year brings more international offerings, including edgy Argentine puppeteers El Chonchón's Spanish version of Romeo and Juliet.

DiverseWorks
DiverseWorks A visiting performance artist once sent a note to DiverseWorks saying, "Once you've done DiverseWorks, you've done Texas." That's a mighty strong statement, but we agree that everyone should "do" DiverseWorks. Now in its 21st year, the funky, intimate performance space has brought consistently challenging and groundbreaking contemporary works to Houston. Homegrown shows like the experimental electronic music festival "Twelve Minutes Max" take shape here each season. But DiverseWorks also has introduced Houstonians to internationally recognized performance artists such as Miranda July and spoken-word celeb Marc Bamuthi Joseph. This year brings more international offerings, including edgy Argentine puppeteers El Chonchón's Spanish version of Romeo and Juliet.

Agora Okay, so Agora isn't just a coffee house -- if all you want is a tall latte to go, we suggest Starbucks. This is a place to linger, to sip, to read. Dark and cozy like a library in one of those rambling Agatha Christie manors, Agora is an easy place to curl up with a book and lose a few hours. But just because it has a dreamy vibe doesn't mean it's quiet all the time: There's a great jukebox, and they serve beer and wine, too. The patio isn't huge, but it does have a nice, shady view of the Westheimer bustle.

Agora
Photo by Craig Hlavaty
Agora Okay, so Agora isn't just a coffee house -- if all you want is a tall latte to go, we suggest Starbucks. This is a place to linger, to sip, to read. Dark and cozy like a library in one of those rambling Agatha Christie manors, Agora is an easy place to curl up with a book and lose a few hours. But just because it has a dreamy vibe doesn't mean it's quiet all the time: There's a great jukebox, and they serve beer and wine, too. The patio isn't huge, but it does have a nice, shady view of the Westheimer bustle.

"give up" Consisting of posters and flyers wheat-pasted to metal boxes all over the Montrose, the "give up" series preaches its message of ironic apathy to all who cruise by. One poster (near Bagby and West Alabama) features a forlorn woman's face and a Pink Floyd-esque row of hammers. "SWEETNESS, I was only joking," says the message at the top. The anonymous artist's trademark "give up" at the bottom serves as both a signature and a tongue-in-cheek addendum. Another work on Westheimer and Taft is a print of a hammer banging nails into the dirt. The whole thing reeks of postmodern appropriation of communist imagery. But before you start thinking too much about the hidden meaning of the series, just remember: The whole point is to give up.

"give up" Consisting of posters and flyers wheat-pasted to metal boxes all over the Montrose, the "give up" series preaches its message of ironic apathy to all who cruise by. One poster (near Bagby and West Alabama) features a forlorn woman's face and a Pink Floyd-esque row of hammers. "SWEETNESS, I was only joking," says the message at the top. The anonymous artist's trademark "give up" at the bottom serves as both a signature and a tongue-in-cheek addendum. Another work on Westheimer and Taft is a print of a hammer banging nails into the dirt. The whole thing reeks of postmodern appropriation of communist imagery. But before you start thinking too much about the hidden meaning of the series, just remember: The whole point is to give up.

Carolyn Wenglar Okay, since we're talking about Warren's, we'd better make this one "best bar moms." The bartending babes -- young and old -- of this venerable downtown watering hole are all delightfully skilled in the stuff of drinks. They can mix virtually anything with flair and flavor; and they can most certainly mix it up with the eclectic blend of patrons drawn to this Market Square institution. When namesake Warren Trousdale died about 15 years ago, there were fears that the place would go with him. But sister Carolyn Wenglar took over and took Warren's to new heights. She and her crew survived the near-death of downtown, the regrettable passing of master bartender Jose Serna and stiff competition from newcomer nightspots. Credit more than a little motherly love from this wonderful cast: Mom's the word when talk turns to Warren's.

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